Diversion – deviation 3.5.1 diversion – deviation A diversion, e.g. from the usual and customary route, may at times be unavoidable.

​Diversion – deviation

Mariner

Diversion – deviation


3.5.1 diversion – deviation

A diversion, e.g. from the usual and customary route, may at times be unavoidable. If a diversion is intended, and if the circumstances allow, the Master must, in the first instance, seek instructions from the Company so that an assessment can be made as to whether the diversion could amount to a deviation, as explained in section 2.16.8 Diversion – deviation.

The Company may need to take out a separate deviation insurance covering cargo or passengers carried on board. The Company must, therefore, be informed to enable them to advise the insurers accordingly.

As substantial sums of money are often involved in connection with the deviation and claims may follow from the charterer or cargo interests for delay in delivery or any deterioration of the cargo, the

Master is advised to keep

  • a detailed log from the time the deviation commences until the vessel is in the same or equidistant position
  • details of all the measures taken.
3.5.2 justifiable diversions

A diversion from the usual and customary route will normally be considered justified if necessary to land ill or injured crew members, passengers, stowaways, refugees or persons rescued from the sea or to save life or property at sea. The Company will often be under a duty to divert in such cases and there are international regulations which oblige the Master to render every possible assistance to save life and property at sea, e.g. a vessel in distress.


3.5 diversion – deviation

The P&I insurance normally covers the Company for certain extra costs incurred in justifiably diverting a ship in the circumstances described above. If circumstances allow, the Master must seek instructions from the Company and the P&I insurer before diverting the vessel. Assistance can also be sought from the P&I insurer’s local correspondent. All the circumstances that cause the Master to divert the vessel should be recorded.

3.5.3 diversion to undertake repairs

In case of damage to or failure of any part of the vessel’s engines or other parts which require repairs at a port en route, both the Hull and Machinery and P&I covers may be involved. Consequently, the Company must be informed, enabling them to contact both insurers. The Hull and Machinery insurer may wish to instruct a surveyor to inspect the damage. An assessment as to whether the diversion could amount to a deviation, may also be necessary, as explained in section 2.16.8 Diversion – Deviation.

3.5.4 Action to be taken (in all cases of diversion – deviation) If a diversion – deviation is undertaken, the Master should immediately refer to the Emergency Contingency Plan. The Company and the P&I insurer or Hull and Machinery insurer, as the case may be, must be informed immediately and the following information provided

  • intended port of call and ETA
  • position, course and speed
  • information about the incident causing the diversion – deviation,

e.g. any fatality, personal injury or vessel in distress etc.

2

3.5 diversion – deviation

3.5.5 evidence to be collected (in all cases of diversion – deviation) • Date and exact time (vessel’s local and UTC (Co-ordinated Universal Time)) of the commencement of the diversion – deviation

  • position where the vessel commenced the diversion – deviation
  • speed, propeller revolutions or propeller pitch of the vessel en route to the intended port of call/position
  • amount of bunkers, other fuels and consumables on board at the commencement of diversion – deviation
  • any records of events having caused the diversion – deviation, including names of persons, vessels, authorities etc. involved
  • date and time of arrival (vessel’s local and UTC (Co-ordinated Universal Time)) in the port of call or intended position
  • duration of stay in the port of call or intended position
  • date and time of departure (vessel’s local and UTC (Co-ordinated Universal Time)) from the port of call or intended position
  • course and speed until the vessel arrived back in the same or equidistant position
  • amount of bunkers, other fuels and consumables at the time the vessel was back in equidistant position
  • courses steered.
3.5.6 documents to be retained (in all cases of diversion – deviation)
  • Copies of any communications with the Company or the P&I insurers on the intended and performed diversion – deviation (paper or electronic)
  • chart used (paper or electronic) – do not tamper with or erase any marks/data
  • deck logbook
  • bridge bell book or scrap log.
21:04
RSS
No comments yet. Be the first to add a comment!
Loading...

Subscriptions

All logbook sections
LogBook Sections from Vadim Bonov