Due to the fact that both the P&I and Hull and Machinery covers may be involved, it is important to consider both aspects, i.e. the damages to the own vessel and the other vessel.

Collision

Mariner

Due to the fact that both the P&I and Hull and Machinery covers may be involved, it is important to consider both aspects, i.e. the damages to the own vessel and the other vessel. The Company, the P&I and the Hull and Machinery insurer should therefore be contacted.

3.3.1 Action to be taken

3.3.1.1 Emergency Contingency Plan

Should a collision occur the Master should immediately refer to the Emergency Contingency Plan.

If oil has escaped from the own or the other vessel involved, the Master must notify the appropriate authorities immediately!

3.3.1.2 General

The Master has the overriding authority and responsibility to make decisions with respect to safety and pollution prevention. The Master should therefore be in overall charge of decisions and should

  • immediately initiate a damage assessment• check the watertight integrity of the vessel, and
  • ensure the safety of the crew and passengers.

Reversing the engines after a collision, but prior to an initial damage assessment, may have catastrophic results as one of the vessels may suddenly lose her buoyancy and sink. The Master is therefore advised to ascertain the extent to which the other vessel needs assistance before reversing the engines.

After taking the steps outlined below, the Master should encourage all witnesses on his/her vessel to immediately record their observations and memories of the events leading up to the collision. The Master should encourage witnesses to give a true and accurate account of the circumstances, even if it is to the detriment of the vessel. Additionally, any photographs or video taken by crew members should be collected and retained. Suitable initiatives by crew members who have collected valuable evidence could be rewarded.

As radar sets are not always provided with a data recorder, plotting sheets should be kept and/or sketches made of the radar observations prior to the collision by those having been on radar watch at the material time. A record of how the radar settings and data were used will also be helpful in reconstructing the course and proving that a proper radar watch was maintained at the time.

A record of any VHF traffic between the vessels involved or with shore installations prior to the collision should be provided in writing to establish what information or warnings of manoeuvres were conveyed.

If the vessel is equipped with ECDIS or other electronic sea charts, these should be stored as soon as possible, if this is not automatically done by the system.

3.3.1.3 Reporting

The Company, the P&I and Hull and Machinery insurers and the local correspondents should be informed immediately, providing the following information

  • name, IMO number, call sign of the vessel
  • name of the Company
  • date and time of the collision, local and UTC (Co-ordinated Universal Time)
  • position/location of the collision
  • any fatality/personal injury on board
  • pollution or risk of pollution
  • extent of damage sustained by the vessel
  • structural damage
  • damage to cargo
  • condition of the vessel (water ingress or stable)
  • own vessel’s destination and ETA
  • the other vessel’s name, flag and call sign
  • any fatality/personal injury on other vessel
  • extent of damage sustained by other vessel
  • structural damage
  • damage to cargo
  • condition of other vessel (water ingress or stable)
  • other vessel’s destination and ETA
  • amount of oil – carried as cargo or fuel – escaped from own vessel and/or from other vessel
  • any loss of cargo overboard as a result of the collision impact
  • prevailing weather conditions at the time of the collision
  • estimated angle of blow.
  • Date and exact time of the collision as recorded on the bridge and any discrepancy between the times noted by the bridge and the engine room, local and UTC (Co-ordinated Universal Time)
  • position/location of the collision
  • courses (chart course, steered course, gyro and magnetic compass) at the time of the collision
  • speed, propeller revolutions or propeller pitch of the vessel at the time of the collision
  • bow and/or stern thruster in operation and rate of power switched to
  • was the helm in manual or automatic at the time of the collision
  • rudder position at the time of the collision
  • any alteration to course and/or speed immediately before the collision, including exact time of the alteration
  • any communications, including orders given to the engine room
  • any signals – acoustic or visual – given by the vessel or heard from the other vessel prior to the collision
  • any communications between the vessel and the other vessel and/ or between both vessels and shore radio stations or traffic control centres
  • if under pilotage, any communications between the pilot and the vessel’s command, including the helmsman, prior to the collision
  • if under pilotage, any communications between the pilot, tugs or shore radio stations or traffic control centres
  • navigation lights shown on the respective vessels at the time of the collision
  • description of how the navigation lights appeared prior to the collision and any changes
  • any compass and/or radar bearings/distances taken and recorded between the vessels prior to the collision
  • any helm or engine manoeuvres before and after the collision and the times of such manoeuvres
  • prevailing weather, wind, sea state, visibility conditions at the time of the collision
  • tide and current at the time of the collision
  • draughts of the respective vessels at the time of the collision
  • names and call signs of any other vessels having witnessed the collision and their approximate positions.
  • Radars – short description of radar settings and changes to the settings with exact times prior to the collision
  • GPS systems – position recorded after button pressed (if done)
  • VHF – short description of its location on the bridge and the channels being operated at the time of the collision, any switches to other channels with exact times prior to the collision
  • electronic chart display – short description of the chart used and when last updated
  • any other navigation or communication equipment used to be described as above.
  • all persons attending the bridge at the time of the incident
  • any lookouts not on the bridge and their positions
  • any other eye witnesses to the collision
  • engine room personnel at the time of the collision
  • any person suffering a fatality or personal injury on board
  • any person suffering a fatality or personal injury on the other vessel
  • any pilot on board at the time of the collision, times of embarkation/disembarkation.

(keep any weather records)

3.3.1.4 Personal injury

If any personal injury occurred as a result of the collision please see section 3.11 Personal injury.

3.3.1.5 Cargo damage

If there is any cargo damage as a result of the collision please see section 3.2 Cargo damage or loss.

3.3.1.6 Pollution

If there is any pollution as a result of the collision please see section 3.12 Pollution.

24

3.3.2

evidence to be collected

3.3.2.1

General information

3.3.2.2 Navigation and communication equipment in use at the time

of the collision

3.3.2.3 Persons involved

Name, rank, duties, whereabouts and contact details of

247

3.3.3 documents to be retained
  • Chart used (paper or electronic) – do not tamper with or erase any marks/data
  • deck logbook
  • bridge bell book or scrap log
  • engine logbook
  • engine bell book or scrap log
  • manoeuvre/course recorder printouts
  • deviation log
  • STCW records of working and rest hours of the Master, officers and crew on duty.

Copies of the above together with copies of other trading documents will be taken by the lawyer or correspondent instructed on behalf of the Company or the insurers.

22:05
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