MSC.1/Circ.

MSC.1-Circ.1364 - Revised International Safetynet Manual (Secretariat)

MSC.1/Circ.1364 24 May 2010

REVISED INTERNATIONAL SAFETYNET MANUAL
1 The Maritime Safety Committee (MSC), at its eighty-seventh session (12 to 21 May 2010), noted and approved the revised International SafetyNET Manual, as prepared by IHO, WMO and IMSO and agreed by the Sub-Committee on Radiocommunications and Search and Rescue (COMSAR) at its fourteenth session (8 to 12 March 2010).
2 This circular supersedes MSC/Circ.1064 and replaces the existing text of the International SafetyNET Manual.
3 The Committee decided that the amendments will come into force on 1 January 2012.
***

MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 1
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ANNEX
IMO International SafetyNET Manual
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 2
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PREFACE
SOLAS regulation IV/12.2 states that "Every ship, while at sea, shall maintain a radio watch for broadcasts of maritime safety information on the appropriate frequency or frequencies on which such information is broadcast for the area in which the ship is navigating".
At the request of the IMO Sub-Committee on Radiocommunications, the International SafetyNET Manual was first produced in 1994. The second edition was published in 2003 containing amendments endorsed by the Maritime Safety Committee at its seventy-sixth session in December 2002 by MSC/Circ.1064.
At its seventh meeting in September 2005, the IHO's Commission on the Promulgation of Radio Navigational Warnings (CPRNW1) established a Working Group to review all World-Wide Navigational Warning Service (WWNWS) documentation. The Working Group included representation from the WMO and prepared at first, revisions to IMO resolutions A.705(17), "Promulgation of Maritime Safety Information" and A.706(17), "World-Wide Navigational Warning Service". The proposed revisions of the resolutions were circulated to IHO Member States under IHB CL 104/2007, endorsed by COMSAR at its twelfth session in April 2008 and subsequently approved by the Maritime Safety Committee at its eighty-fifth session in November/December 2008 by MSC.1/Circ.1287 and MSC.1/Circ.1288 respectively.
The IHO CPRNW1 Working Group then prepared the revised Joint IMO/IHO/WMO Manual on Maritime Safety Information incorporating the revised information from resolutions A.705(17), as amended and A.706(17), as amended. The revised text of the Joint IMO/IHO/WMO Manual on Maritime Safety Information was circulated to IHO Member States under cover of IHB CL 70/2008, endorsed by COMSAR at its thirteenth session in January 2009 and subsequently approved by the Maritime Safety Committee at its eighty-sixth session in May/June 2009 by MSC.1/Circ.1310.
Continuing with the holistic approach of reviewing all the MSI documents from the top-down, the IHO WWNWS Working Group prepared the third revision of the International SafetyNET Manual. The revised text of the International SafetyNET Manual was circulated to IHO Member States under cover of IHB CL 68/2009, endorsed by COMSAR at its fourteenth session in March 2010 and subsequently approved by the Maritime Safety Committee at its eighty-seventh session in May 2010.
1 CPRNW was renamed the IHO WWNWS Sub Committee (WWNWS) with effect from 1 January 2009.
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 3
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CONTENTS
SECTION PAGE 1. GENERAL INFORMATION 4 2. SAFETYNET SERVICE 2.1 Introduction 2.2 Definitions 2.2.2 NAVAREAS with Inmarsat satellite ocean region coverage 2.2.3 METAREAS with Inmarsat satellite ocean region coverage 4 4 6 11 12 3. GENERAL FEATURES OF THE EGC SYSTEM 13 4. PLANNING OF NEW SAFETYNET SERVICES 13 5. CHANGES TO SAFETYNET SERVICES 14 6. OPERATION OF THE INTERNATIONAL SAFETYNET SERVICE 14 7. PROMULGATION OF MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION 16 8. MESSAGE FORMATTING AND C CODES 17 9. MONITORING OF MSI BROADCASTS 9.3 EGC SafetyNET Log 18 19 10. QUALITY CONTROL OF MSI BROADCASTS 10.1 Misuse of C-codes 10.2 Improper use of C1 priority codes 10.3 Improper use of C2 service codes 10.4 Improper use of C4 repetition codes 19 19 19 20 21 11. Accessing the SafetyNET service 22 12. Land Earth Station functions 22 13. Receiving SafetyNET broadcasts 23 14. Charges for SafetyNET services 25 Annex 1 - International SafetyNET Co-ordinating Panel 1 Terms of reference 2 Contact address 3 Panel membership 26 26 26 26 Annex 2 - Authorization, Certification and Registration of SafetyNET information providers 1 Authorization 2 Certification 3 Registration 4 Contact addresses 5 Sample Certificate of Authorization 27 27 27 28 28 28 29 Annex 3 - The Inmarsat system 1 Introduction 2 Bandwidths 3 The space segment 4 The ground segment 5 Mobile Earth Stations (MESs) 30 30 30 30 30 31 Annex 4 - Operational guidance Part A - Navigational warning services Part B - Meteorological services Part C - Search and rescue services Part D - Piracy countermeasures broadcast messages Part E - Repetition Codes (C4) 32 35 37 39 43 46 Annex 5 - EGC receiver specifications 48 Annex 6 - Procedure for amending the International SafetyNET Manual 57
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 4
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1 – GENERAL INFORMATION
SafetyNET is an international automatic direct-printing satellite-based service for the promulgation of navigational and meteorological warnings, meteorological forecasts, Search and Rescue (SAR) information and other urgent safety-related messages – maritime safety information (MSI) – to ships. It has been developed as a safety service of the Inmarsat-C enhanced group call system to provide a simple and automated means of receiving MSI on board ships at sea. The message-selection features of SafetyNET receivers enable mariners to receive safety information broadcasts that are tailored to their particular needs.
SafetyNET fulfils an integral role in the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) developed by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and incorporated into the 1988 amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS), 1974, as amended, as a requirement for ships to which the Convention applies.
This Manual describes the structure and operation of the International SafetyNET Service. It is intended primarily for national Administrations and registered information providers, but may also be useful to the mariner who requires more operational information than is found in manufacturers' equipment manuals.
2 – SAFETYNET SERVICE
2.1 Introduction
2.1.1 SafetyNET provides shipping with navigational and meteorological warnings, meteorological forecasts, shore-to-ship distress alerts, SAR information and other urgent information in accordance with the requirements of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS), 1974, as amended. It is suitable for use in all sizes and types of ships. Figure 1 illustrates the way the service is structured.
2.1.2 SafetyNET is a service of Inmarsat's Enhanced Group Call (EGC) system and was specifically designed for promulgation of MSI as a part of the GMDSS. The EGC system (technically a part of the Inmarsat-C system) provides an automatic method of broadcasting messages to both fixed and variable geographical areas. It is designed with the capability to provide services within the coverage areas of geostationary satellites, know as satellite ocean regions (approximately between 76° N and 76° S). In addition to providing services to ships operating in sea area A3, it also provides the means of disseminating MSI to coastal warning areas not covered by the International NAVTEX service.
2.1.3 SafetyNET offers the ability to direct a message to a given geographical area. The area may be fixed, as in the case of a NAVAREA/METAREA or coastal warning area; or it may be a user defined area (circular or rectangular). A user defined area is used for messages, such as a local storm warning or a shore-to-ship distress alert, for which it is inappropriate to alert ships in an entire satellite ocean region or NAVAREA/METAREA. The general EGC system capabilities are shown in Figure 2.
2.1.4 SafetyNET messages are submitted by registered information providers for broadcast to the appropriate satellite ocean region(s) via an Inmarsat-C Land Earth Station (LES). Messages are broadcast according to their priority, i.e. distress, urgency or safety. Aboard ship, messages are received by type-approved Inmarsat-C or Mini-C mobile terminals with EGC SafetyNET capability.
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 5
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Figure 1 – The International SafetyNET Service system
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 6
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Figure 2 – Basic concept of the Inmarsat Enhanced Group Call system
2.2 Definitions
2.2.1 For the purposes of this manual, the following definitions apply:
.1 Coastal warning means a navigational warning promulgated as part of a numbered series by a National co-ordinator. Broadcast shall be made by the International NAVTEX service to defined NAVTEX service areas and/or by the International SafetyNET service to coastal warning areas. (In addition, Administrations may issue coastal warnings by other means.)
.2 Coastal warning area means a unique and precisely defined sea area within a NAVAREA/METAREA or Sub-Area established by a coastal state for the purpose of co-ordinating the broadcast of coastal maritime safety information through the SafetyNET service.
.3 Enhanced Group Call (EGC) means the system for broadcasting messages via the mobile satellite communications system operated by Inmarsat Global Limited. EGC is a part of the Inmarsat-C system and supports two services: SafetyNET and FleetNET.
.4 FleetNET means the commercial service for the broadcasting and automatic reception of fleet management and general public information by means of direct printing through Inmarsat's EGC system. Some receivers for FleetNET may not be able to receive SafetyNET.
.5 Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) means the global communications service based upon automated systems, both satellite and terrestrial, to provide distress alerting and promulgation of Maritime Safety Information for mariners.
.6 HF NBDP means High Frequency narrow-band direct-printing, using radio telegraphy as defined in Recommendation ITU-R M.688.
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 7
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.7 In-force bulletin means a list of serial numbers of those NAVAREA, Sub-Area or coastal warnings in force issued and broadcast by the NAVAREA co-ordinator, Sub-Area co-ordinator or National co-ordinator during at least the previous six weeks.
.8 Inmarsat B means the digital satellite communications system for transmission of voice, telex, facsimile or data using directional antennas. (Note: Inmarsat B will be discontinued from 31 December 2014)
.9 Inmarsat-C means the digital satellite communications system for store-and-forward text or data messaging using mobile terminals with omni-directional antennas. Inmarsat-C is the only system that allows ships to meet the majority of the satellite communication requirements of the GMDSS including distress alerting, reception of maritime safety information and general communications.
.10 Inmarsat Mini-C means smaller terminals, based on the same technical requirements as Inmarsat-C terminals. Some models are approved as GMDSS compliant terminals.
.11 Inmarsat Fleet means the digital satellite communication system that provides voice and flexible data communication services, e-mail and secure internet access for maritime users, comprising a family of Fleet F77, F55 and F33 mobile terminals. The Inmarsat Fleet F77 system provides voice distress and safety functionality and meets the requirements of IMO resolution A.1001(25).
.12 Inmarsat FleetBroadband means the communication service that provides voice and high-speed data services, simultaneously, through compact terminals for maritime users.
.13 International NAVTEX service means the co-ordinated broadcast and automatic reception on 518 kHz of maritime safety information by means of narrow-band direct-printing telegraphy using the English language2.
.14 International SafetyNET service means the co-ordinated broadcasting and automated reception of maritime safety information via the Inmarsat Enhanced Group Call (EGC) system, using the English language, in accordance with the provisions of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, as amended.
.15 Land Earth Station (LES) means a fixed terrestrial station acting as a gateway between terrestrial communication networks and the Inmarsat satellites in the maritime mobile-satellite service. This may also be referred to as a Coast Earth Station (CES).
.16 Land Earth Station Operator (LESO) means an Inmarsat service provider which owns and operates the LES.
.17 Local warning means a navigational warning which covers inshore waters, often within the limits of jurisdiction of a harbour or port authority.
2 As set out in the IMO NAVTEX Manual.
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 8
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.18 Maritime safety information (MSI)3 means navigational and meteorological warnings, meteorological forecasts and other urgent safety-related messages broadcast to ships.
.19 Maritime safety information service means the internationally and nationally co-ordinated network of broadcasts containing information which is necessary for safe navigation.
.20 METAREA means a geographical sea area4 established for the purpose of co-ordinating the broadcast of marine meteorological information. The term METAREA followed by a roman numeral may be used to identify a particular sea area. The delimitation of such areas is not related to and shall not prejudice the delimitation of any boundaries between States (See Figure 4).
.21 METAREA issuing service means the National Meteorological Service which has accepted responsibility for ensuring that meteorological forecasts and warnings are disseminated through the Inmarsat SafetyNET service to the designated METAREA or other area.
.22 Meteorological information means the marine meteorological warning and forecast information in accordance with the provisions of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, as amended.
.23 Mobile Earth Station (MES) means a mobile user terminal in the Inmarsat maritime mobile-satellite service. This may also be referred to as Ship Earth Station (SES).
.24 National co-ordinator means the national authority charged with collating and issuing coastal warnings within a national area of responsibility.
.25 National NAVTEX service means the broadcast and automatic reception of maritime safety information by means of narrow-band direct-printing telegraphy using frequencies other than 518 kHz and languages as decided by the Administration concerned.
.26 National SafetyNET service means the broadcasting and automated reception of maritime safety information via the Inmarsat EGC system, using languages as decided by the Administration concerned.
.27 NAVAREA means a geographical sea area4 established for the purpose of co-ordinating the broadcast of navigational warnings. The term NAVAREA followed by a roman numeral may be used to identify a particular sea area. The delimitation of such areas is not related to and shall not prejudice the delimitation of any boundaries between States (See Figure 3).
.28 NAVAREA co-ordinator means the authority charged with co-ordinating, collating and issuing NAVAREA warnings for a designated NAVAREA.
.29 NAVAREA warning means a navigational warning or in-force bulletin promulgated as part of a numbered series by a NAVAREA co-ordinator.
3 as defined in Regulation IV/2 of the 1974 SOLAS Convention, as amended. 4 which may include inland seas, lakes and waterways navigable by sea-going ships.
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 9
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.30 Navigational warning means a message containing urgent information relevant to safe navigation broadcast to ships in accordance with the provisions of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, as amended.
.31 NAVTEX means the system for the broadcast and automatic reception of maritime safety information by means of narrow-band direct-printing telegraphy.
.32 NAVTEX service area means a unique and precisely defined sea area for which maritime safety information is provided from a particular NAVTEX transmitter.
.33 NAVTEX co-ordinator means the authority charged with operating and managing one or more NAVTEX stations broadcasting maritime safety information as part of the International NAVTEX service.
.34 Network Co-ordination Station (NCS) means a fixed land station in the Inmarsat satellite communications system which controls channel assignments and provides the network management functions for each of the four satellite ocean regions. NCSs also transmit EGC messages on the NCS common channel.
.35 Other urgent safety-related information means maritime safety information broadcast to ships that is not defined as a navigational warning, meteorological information or SAR information. This may include, but is not limited to, significant malfunctions or changes to maritime communications systems, and new or amended mandatory ship reporting systems or maritime regulations affecting ships at sea.
.36 Registered information provider means a maritime safety information provider (MSI provider), authorized in accordance with Annex 2 of the International SafetyNET Manual, which has an agreement with one or more LES(s) for providing SafetyNET services.
.37 Rescue Co-ordination Centre (RCC) means a unit responsible for promoting efficient organization of search and rescue services and for coordinating the conduct of search and rescue operations within a search and rescue region.
.38 SafetyNET means the international service for the broadcasting and automatic reception of maritime safety information via the Inmarsat EGC system. SafetyNET receiving capability is part of the mandatory equipment which is required to be carried by certain ships in accordance with the provisions of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, as amended.
.39 SAR information means distress alert relays and other urgent search and rescue information broadcast to ships.
.40 Satellite Ocean Region means the area on the earth's surface within which a mobile or fixed antenna can obtain line-of-sight communications with one of the four primary Inmarsat geostationary satellites. This area may also be referred to as the "footprint":
Atlantic Ocean Region – East (AOR-E) Atlantic Ocean Region – West (AOR-W) Indian Ocean Region (IOR) Pacific Ocean Region (POR)
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 10
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.41 Sea Area A1 means an area within the radiotelephone coverage of at least one VHF coast station in which continuous DSC5 alerting is available, as may be defined by a Contracting Government.
.42 Sea Area A2 means an area, excluding sea area A1, within the radiotelephone coverage of at least one MF coast station in which continuous DSC alerting is available, as may be defined by a Contracting Government.
.43 Sea Area A3 means an area, excluding sea areas A1 and A2, within the coverage of an Inmarsat geostationary satellite in which continuous alerting is available.
.44 Sea Area A4 means an area outside sea areas A1, A2 and A3.
.45 Sub-Area means a sub-division of a NAVAREA/METAREA in which a number of countries have established a co-ordinated system for the promulgation of maritime safety information. The delimitation of such areas is not related to and shall not prejudice the delimitation of any boundaries between States.
.46 Sub-Area co-ordinator means the authority charged with co-ordinating, collating and issuing Sub-Area warnings for a designated Sub-Area.
.47 Sub-Area warning means a navigational warning promulgated as part of a numbered series by a Sub-Area co-ordinator. Broadcast shall be made by the International NAVTEX service to defined NAVTEX service areas or by the International SafetyNET service (through the appropriate NAVAREA co-ordinator.)
.48 User defined area means a temporary geographic area, either circular or rectangular, to which maritime safety information is addressed.
.49 UTC means Co-ordinated Universal Time which is equivalent to GMT (or ZULU) as the international time standard
.50 World-Wide Navigational Warning Service (WWNWS)6 means the internationally and nationally co-ordinated service for the promulgation of navigational warnings.
.51 In the operating procedures co-ordination means that the allocation of the time for data broadcast is centralized, the format and criteria of data transmissions are compliant as described in the Joint IMO/IHO/WMO Manual on Maritime Safety Information and that all services are managed as set out in IMO resolutions A.705(17), as amended and A.(706)17, as amended.
5 Digital selective calling (DSC) means a technique using digital codes which enables a radio station to establish contact with and transfer information to another station or group of stations and complying with the relevant recommendations of the International Radio Consultative Committee ((CCIR) – "Radiocommunications Bureau of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU)" from 1 March 1993). 6 as set out in resolution A.706(17), as amended.
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 11
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Figure 3 NAVAREAS for coordinating and promulgating radio navigational warnings under the World-Wide Navigational Warning Service, including Inmarsat satellite footprints The delimitation of such areas is not related to and shall not prejudice the delimitation of any boundaries between States
LIMITS OF NAVAREAS
2.2.2 NAVAREAS with Inmarsat satellite ocean region coverage
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 12
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2.2.3 METAREAS with Inmarsat satellite ocean region coverage
Figure 4 METAREAS for coordinating and promulgating meteorological warnings and forecasts including Inmarsat satellite footprints The delimitation of such areas is not related to and shall not prejudice the delimitation of any boundaries between States.
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 13
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3 – GENERAL FEATURES OF THE EGC SYSTEM
3.1 The Inmarsat-C EGC system supports two different services:
.1 SafetyNET – for promulgation of MSI; and
.2 FleetNET – for transmission of fleet management, general public information and other information to fleets or groups of ships. The FleetNET service is not part of the GMDSS.
3.2 All navigable waters of the world between 76° N and 76° S are covered by satellites in the Inmarsat system. Each satellite transmits EGC messages on a designated channel; this channel is optimized to enable the signal to be received by Inmarsat-C or Mini-C terminals with EGC SafetyNET capability. Reception of EGC messages is normally not affected by the position of the ship within the satellite ocean region, atmospheric conditions or time of day.
3.3 SafetyNET messages are addressed to a geographical area (area calls), where as FleetNET messages are addressed to groups of ships (group calls):
.1 Area calls (SafetyNET) can be addressed to a fixed geographical area (NAVAREA/METAREA or coastal warning area) or to a user defined area selected by an MSI provider. Area calls will be received automatically by any SafetyNET receiver within the area. To receive SafetyNET coastal warnings, the EGC receiver must be set up with appropriate B1 and B2 codes – where the B1 Code is the designator of the defined area and the B2 Code is the subject indicator (See section 13.4).
.2 Group calls (FleetNET) will be received automatically by any ship whose EGC receiver acknowledges the unique group identity associated with a particular message.
4 – PLANNING OF NEW SAFETYNET SERVICES
4.1 Authorities wishing to become officially registered information providers of MSI to ships at sea via SafetyNET, should contact the IMO via the International SafetyNET Coordinating Panel at an early stage for advice. The plans of any prospective registered information providers should be co-ordinated with the IMO, IHO and WMO and with other national authorities, before authorization to broadcast via SafetyNET may be granted by the International SafetyNET Panel, in accordance with the procedures set out in Annex 2.
4.2 Once authorized and registered, information providers should contact the LES operator(s) or service provider(s) they desire to use for promulgation of information to their areas of responsibility, in order to determine specific details for addressing messages, accessing the LES, charges and payment for services and any other matters with respect to providing MSI to mariners.
4.3 The International SafetyNET Coordinating Panel, in co-operation with IHO and WMO, undertakes the co-ordination of times for scheduled transmissions.
4.4 Mariners should be informed of the establishment of a SafetyNET service by the inclusion of full details in Notices to Mariners and other national nautical publications and the IMO Master Plan of Shore-Based Facilities for the GMDSS, as amended. In addition, full details of the service should be sent to the International SafetyNET Co-ordinating Panel at the address given in Annex 1.
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 14
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4.5 Questions concerning promulgation of MSI through the EGC SafetyNET service can be addressed to the International SafetyNET Co-ordinating Panel at the address given in Annex 1.
4.6 Questions concerning the operation of the Inmarsat system should be addressed to Maritime Safety Services, Inmarsat Global Ltd, 99 City Road, London EC1Y 1AX, United Kingdom. E-mail address: maritime_safety@inmarsat.com
5 – CHANGES TO EXISTING SAFETYNET SERVICES
5.1 Registered information providers wishing to change their existing SafetyNET service should follow the same co-ordination procedures as for a new service, in accordance with the procedures set out in Annex 2
5.2 Mariners should be informed of the changes to an existing SafetyNET service by the inclusion of full details in Notices to Mariners and other national nautical publications and the IMO Master Plan of Shore-Based Facilities for the GMDSS, as amended. In addition, full details of the service should be sent to the International SafetyNET Co-ordinating Panel at the address given in Annex 1.
6 – OPERATION OF THE INTERNATIONAL SAFETYNET SERVICE
6.1 Given the size of a satellite ocean region, some form of selectivity in receiving and printing the various messages is required. All ships within the footprint of a selected satellite will receive area calls, however, they will only be displayed and printed by those receivers that recognize both;
.1 the fixed geographical area (NAVAREA/METAREA), user defined area as appropriate, and;
.2 for coastal warnings, the coastal warning area and the subject indicator for the message.
6.2 The message format includes a preamble which enables the EGC receiver to display and print only those MSI messages which relate to its present position, to the intended route, or to the afore mentioned areas as programmed by the operator.
6.3 For coastal warning areas messages, the MSI provider must ensure that the preamble includes the B1 Code identifier allocated for the particular area, along with the appropriate B2 Code subject indicator (See section 13.4). The EGC receiver can be set to reject messages concerning certain optional subjects which may not be required by the ship (e.g. LORAN messages may be rejected in a ship which is not fitted with a LORAN receiver). Receivers also use the B2 Code subject indicator, to identify coastal warnings which, because of their importance, may NOT be rejected.
6.4 Reception of certain types of messages, such as shore-to-ship distress alerts, SAR information, meteorological warnings and forecasts and navigational warnings, addressed to a geographical area within which the EGC receiver is located, is mandatory and cannot be suppressed by ships in the affected area. These messages are identified by the C2 service codes: 00, 04, 14, 24, 31, 34 and 44 (See Annex 4).
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 15
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6.5 When a message has been received error-free, a record is made of the message identification (the unique sequence number, the LES identifier and the service code) associated with that message. The unique sequence number is used to suppress the printing of repeated transmissions of the same message.
6.6 An EGC receiver is capable of storing at least 255 message identifications. These message identifications are stored with an indication of the number of hours that have elapsed since the last receipt of the message. Subsequent reception of the same message identification will reset this timer. After between 60 and 72 hours, message identifications may be automatically erased. If the number of received message identifications exceeds the capacity of memory allocated, the oldest message identification will be erased.
6.7 SafetyNET messages can be addressed to user defined areas, which may be circular or rectangular in shape. A circular area is described by latitude and longitude of the centre in degrees and radius of the circle in nautical miles. A rectangular area is described by latitude and longitude of the southwest corner in degrees and extension in degrees to the North and East of the rectangle.
6.8 In the case of a ship in distress, it is normal to create a circular user defined area (C2 service code 14), defined by the position of the casualty and a radius around the casualty to alert ships that may be able to render assistance (See Figure 5). If no response is received from any ship at the first call, the area can be expanded in steps until an acknowledgement by one or more ships is received. In cases where the position of the distress is unknown, a shore to ship distress alert can be transmitted to all ships (C2 service code 00), in a given satellite ocean region. SAR co-ordination messages shall only be addressed to circular (C2 service code 14) or to rectangular (C2 service code 34) user defined areas (See Figure 6).
Figure 5 – SafetyNET message addressing to a circular area
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 16
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7 – PROMULGATION OF MARITIME SAFETY INFORMATION
7.1 Maritime safety information is promulgated by officially registered information providers whose Certificates of Authorization to broadcast via SafetyNET are issued by the IMO in accordance with the procedures in Annex 2. Registered information providers include for example:
.1 NAVAREA Co-ordinators: for NAVAREA warnings and other urgent safety-related information;
.2 National Co-ordinators: for coastal warnings and other urgent safety-related information;
.3 METAREA issuing services: for meteorological warnings and forecasts; and
.4 Rescue Co-ordination Centres: for shore-to-ship distress alerts, SAR information and other urgent safety-related information.
7.2 All METAREA/NAVAREA, Sub-Area and coastal warnings shall be broadcast only in English in the international SafetyNET service in accordance with IMO resolution A.706(17), as amended. In addition to the required broadcasts in English, METAREA/NAVAREA, Sub-Area and coastal warnings may be broadcast in a national language using a national SafetyNET service.
7.3 Registered information providers shall take into account the need for contingency planning.
Figure 6 – SafetyNET message addressing to a rectangular area
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 17
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8 – MESSAGE FORMATTING AND C CODES
8.1 EGC messages include instructions to the LES for processing MSI in the form of a special address header that consists of five (or six) C-codes as described below. In order for a message to be correctly processed, it must always consist of data conforming to C codes "1" to "5". Additionally, C code "0" shall be used when required by the service provider.
C0 Ocean Region code - 1 digit (when required) 0 - Atlantic Ocean Region - West 1 - Atlantic Ocean Region - East 2 - Pacific Ocean Region 3 - Indian Ocean Region 9 - all ocean regions (Note: availability of C0 = 9 should be checked with LES operator or service provider) C1 priority code - 1 digit code C2 service code - 2 digit code C3 address code - 2, 4, 10 or 12 alphanumeric code C4 repetition code - 2 digit code C5 presentation code - normally a 2 digit code
C Codes
C0 Ocean Region code (when required)
C1 Priority code
C2 Service code
C3 Address code
C4 Repetition code
(See Annex 4, Part E)
C5 Presentatio n code
1 digit code
1 digit code 2 digit code 2, 4, 10 or 12 alphanumeric code 2 digit code Normally a 2 digit code
0 - AOR-W
1 – AOR-E
2 – POR
3 – IOR
9 – All Ocean Regions1
1 - Safety
2 - Urgency
3 - Distress
00 – All ships (general call) 2 digit - 00 (All ships)
Category (a) –
for EGC messages to be repeated a finite number of times.
Category (b) –
for EGC messages to be repeated at specified intervals until cancelled by the MSI provider.
00
04 – Navigational, Meteorological or Piracy warning to a rectangular area 12 alphanumeric rectangular area address D1D2N(S)D3D4D5E(W)D6D7D8D9D10 13 – Navigational, Meteorological or Piracy Coastal warning 4 alphanumeric coastal warning area address X1X2B1B2 14 – Shore-to-Ship Distress Alert to a circular area 10 alphanumeric circular area address D1D2N(S)D3D4E(W)M1M2M 24 – Navigational, Meteorological or Piracy warning to a circular area 10 alphanumeric circular area address D1D2N(S)D3D4E(W)M1M2M3 31 – NAVAREA/ METAREA warning, MET Forecast or Piracy warning to NAVAREA /METAREA 2 digit – NAVAREA/METAREA number 34 – SAR Coordination to a rectangular area 12 alphanumeric rectangular area address D1D2N(S)D3D4D5E(W)D6D7D8D9D10 44 – SAR Coordination to a circular area 10 alphanumeric circular area address D1D2N(S)D3D4E(W)M1M2M3 1) Subject to availability through LES or service provider
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 18
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8.2 The syntax of the special address header in relation to the exact number of digits and/or alphanumeric characters, and to the spaces between each C code, is critical and must conform to the format required by the LES or service provider used.
8.3 SafetyNET messages are stored at the LES until transmitted the appropriate number of times, as specified by the C4 code, although the MSI provider may also cancel a message at any time by sending an appropriate cancellation message to the LES.
8.4 Cancellation procedure may vary between different LESs or service providers. Detailed operational procedure is contained in the instructions on sending EGC broadcast given to the MSI providers after registration with the LES operator or service providers.
8.5 Messages destined for areas of satellite overlap that are required to be transmitted through more than one Satellite, should be sent to more than one LES (i.e. one in each satellite ocean region) to ensure they are received by all intended ships. This may require co-ordination with adjacent NAVAREA/METAREA and other MSI providers. In an area of overlap coverage from two or three ocean region satellites, distress alert relays and urgency warnings will be broadcast over all satellites which cover the affected region.
8.6 Scheduled broadcasts are made over nominated satellites and at specified times, as allocated by the IMO International SafetyNET Co-ordinating Panel. These schedules are published in national nautical publications and the IMO Master Plan of Shore-Based Facilities for the GMDSS, as amended.
8.7 MSI providers shall adhere to their published scheduled broadcast times to facilitate reception of messages.
9 – MONITORING OF MSI BROADCASTS
9.1 In order to ensure the integrity of the MSI being broadcast, MSI providers must monitor the broadcasts which they originate in accordance to IMO resolution A.706(17), as amended. Monitoring is especially important in a highly automated system, which is dependent on careful adherence to procedure and format. This shall be accomplished by the installation of an EGC receiver to enable each MSI provider to:
.1 check that the message has been broadcast;
.2 confirm that the message is received correctly;
.3 ensure that cancellation messages are properly executed; and
.4 observe any unexplained delay in the message being broadcast.
9.2 EGC receivers only display or print messages on the first occasion they are received. Therefore, in order for MSI providers to confirm that all messages in force are still being transmitted by the LES, and that cancelled messages are no longer being transmitted, the EGC receiver used by the MSI provider to monitor their SafetyNET broadcasts should be powered down (including the transceiver), and re-booted at regular intervals, where ever this is possible.
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 19
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Alternatively, MSI providers should consult their equipment supplier for specialist EGC monitoring software which would not require the MES to be re-booted.
9.3 EGC SafetyNET Log
All Inmarsat-C and mini-C MESs capable of receiving MSI, have an EGC SafetyNET Log, which contains information on all SafetyNET messages received by the terminal.
Message Number
LES Service Priority Rec Date & Time Size
Seq. No
Routeing 10022405.egc 321 MET/NAV Warning/Forecast Safety 10-02-24 03:31 2263 1605 Prn+Mem 10022402.egc 321 SAR Coordination Urgency 10-02-24 03:02 1506 1604 Prn+Mem 10022401.egc 322 Coastal Warning/Forecast Safety 10-02-23 02:56 269 9154 Prn+Mem 10022302.egc 304 Distress Alert Relay Distress 10-02-23 20:44 769 691 Prn+Mem 10022305.egc 317 NAV Warning Safety 10-02-23 19:41 819 8318 Prn+Mem 10022302.egc 322 MET Warning Safety 10-02-23 19:35 2358 9150 Prn+Mem
Figure 7 - Example of an EGC SafetyNET Log
This information includes:
Message number: Generated by the terminal LES: ID of the LES which broadcast the message Service: The MES software translates the C2 service code used in the message address and displays a short title for the particular type message service. Priority: The MES software translates the C1 priority code used in the message address and displays the appropriate Priority. This could be either; Safety, Urgency or Distress. Rec Date & Time: The date time group YY-MM-DD HH:mm of when the message was received. Size: Usually in number of bits or characters. Seq. No: The unique message sequence or reference number allocated to the message by the addressed LES. Routing: Message routeing (memory or memory and printer) – set up by the MES operator or a mandatory routeing for Urgency and Distress priority messages.
10 – QUALITY CONTROL OF MSI BROADCASTS
10.1 Misuse of C-codes Monitoring of MSI broadcasts is a vital tool to show instances of misuse of C1 (priority), C2 (service) and C4 (repetition) codes and other technical or operational problems in connection with preparing and broadcasting EGC messages. Misuse of C-codes results in incorrect understanding of MSI services and types of message, multiple reception of unwanted messages received on ships and delay in receiving vital information.
10.2 Improper use of C1 priority codes
This refers mainly to the use of service code C2 = 14 "Ship-to-Shore distress alerts" which require using C1 = 3 Distress priority code only. Problems are caused when the service code C1 = 2 is used by mistake, as in the following example. When C1 = 2 is erroneously used in conjunction with C2 = 14, the header of the message received on a ship is displayed and printed as:
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 20
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 LES xxx - MSG 1210 – Distress Urgent Call to Area: 14N 66W 300 – PosOK, where:
– LES xxx – ID of the LES; – MSG 1210 – message number; – Distress Call to Area – decoding of service C2 = 14; – Urgent – decoding of priority C1 = 2; – 14N 66W 300 – circular position the message was sent to, where 14N 66W – centre of the circle and 300 is radius of the circle in nautical miles; and – PosOK – indicator that the MES's position status is valid or the position was updated within the last 12 hours.
The message header contains reference to two different priorities at the same time – Distress and Urgent (the same problem may be evident in the EGC log or message list), which misleads mariners about the message importance and its content. This is an important issue, particularly for non-SOLAS users, where an EGC message received with conflicting Urgency and Distress priorities may NOT be printed out automatically, which could cause a delay in reacting to the vital information.
If an EGC message is submitted with Urgency priority, service code C1 = 2 and another message is sent with Distress priority afterwards, priority code C1 = 3, the message with Urgency priority will be aborted and the message with Distress priority will be handled first.
10.3 Improper use of C2 service codes
There are cases when MSI providers submit an EGC SafetyNET message using improper C2 service codes and a sample is given below:
LES xxx – MSG 5213 – Met/NavWarn Urgent Call to Area: 35N 23E 300 – PosOK FROM: Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre xxx TO: ALL SHIPS IN xxxxxxx
SAR SITREP NO: 02
FISHING BOAT 'xxx' WITH THREE PERSONS ON BOARD DEPARTED FROM xxx ISLAND ON xxx AT NOONTIME AND SINCE THEN NO INFORMATION ABOUT HER. PARTICULARS … SHIPS SAILING IN VICINITY ARE KINDLY REQUESTED TO KEEP A SHARP LOOK OUT INFORMING MRCC REGARDS DUTY OFFICER
The message was sent using service code C2 = 24 "Met/Nav warning to circular area", as shown in the message header, but the text of the message content is concerned with SAR co-ordination. The correct C2 code for this type of message should have been C2 = 14. Use of the incorrect C2 codes, may delay delivery of the vital SAR information.
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 21
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Another example is the improper use of rectangular addressing, e.g., service code C2 = 04, for coastal warnings whereby the addressed rectangular area covers areas far beyond coastal areas. In this case, ships receive unwanted information for areas other than those in which they are navigating.
Reception of EGC SafetyNET Coastal Warnings is an option and to receive these messages, MESs should be programmed or set up accordingly; otherwise Coastal warnings will not be received, regardless of the ship's position. If a coastal warning-type message is addressed to a rectangular area, ALL ships, whose position is inside the addressed rectangle, will receive the message. The main problem here is not only misusing service codes, which are specified by the International SafetyNET Manual, but reception (and printing) of multiple unwanted messages which ships may never require.
10.4 Improper use of C4 repetition codes
Repetition codes detailed in Annex 4, Part E, are used by MSI providers to "instruct" the Inmarsat-C system to repeat a SafetyNET message a finite number of times or at specific intervals until cancelled by the information provider.
MSI is submitted for broadcast with repetitions, either 6 minutes after initial broadcast (with 6 minutes "echo") or every 1, 2, 3, 4,…48,… or 120 hours until cancelled by the MSI provider. Each message, when submitted for broadcast, is given a unique reference number. When the message is received by the MES, the reference number is "recorded" by the mobile terminal and stored in the memory. When the same message is re-broadcast later, using any C4 repetition codes, MESs receive it and "recognize" the reference number by cross-checking the list of numbers of messages already received. Messages received with the same unique reference number will not be displayed or printed out for a second time.
Note: An EGC message, which requires a multiple broadcast, should be addressed with the proper repetition code and requires only a single submission to the LES. The process of repeated broadcast will be controlled by the repetition code.
When the same SafetyNET message is submitted for broadcast for a second (or third or more) time, the addressed LES will give the message another reference or sequence number and mobile terminals will not be able to "recognize" it as the same message. In this case each subsequent message submitted to the LES for repetition will be received by MESs and may be automatically printed out.
SafetyNET monitoring shows that some MSI providers do not use the recommended repetition code and in this case MESs receive and print unwanted messages, which will fill up the MES's memory rather quickly and waste printing paper.
Notes:
1. Some MSI is broadcast only once on receipt using repetition code C4 = 01.
2. Mariners are advised not to engage in routine communications during the periods designated for scheduled MSI SafetyNET broadcasts. The 6 minute repeat or echo should be used for non-scheduled broadcasts.
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 22
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Below is an example of the same weather forecast submitted for broadcast twice and having two different reference numbers:
LES xxx – MSG 1032 – MetWarn/Fore Safety Call to Area: xx – PosOK xxx CSAT 23423440010402 xx-NOV-2010 09:55:41 103000 SECURITE HIGH SEAS BULLETIN FOR METAREA xx ISSUED AT 0800 ON xx NOV 2010 BY THE MET OFFICE …
LES xxx – MSG 1033 – MetWarn/Fore Safety Call to Area: xx – PosOK xxx CSAT 23423440010402 xx-NOV-2010 10:10:13 103453 SECURITE HIGH SEAS BULLETIN FOR METAREA xx ISSUED AT 0800 ON xx NOV 2010 BY THE MET OFFICE
The message (size about 4,800 characters) was received and printed twice since it was submitted to the LES for broadcast twice and was given two separate reference numbers – 103000 and 103453.
If the message had been submitted once with, for example C4 = 11 (transmit on receipt followed by repeat 6 minutes later), it would have been given one reference number and received and printed only once.
11 – ACCESSING THE SAFETYNET SERVICE
11.1 MSI messages are transmitted to LESs providing Inmarsat-C services in accordance with national and international routeing arrangements. Each user interface has its own access procedure and syntax command, which should be checked with the Inmarsat-C LES operator or service provider.
11.2 Some LESs may provide e-mail, or internet (direct) drop access to the SafetyNET service that allows registered MSI providers to send EGC messages using e-mail from any computer with access to the internet. Due to the nature of the internet, an e-mail service may not guarantee that EGC messages will be received by the addressed LES without delay and may not support cancellation procedures. For this reason monitoring of all EGC messages is especially important in accordance with Section 9 above.
12 – LAND EARTH STATION FUNCTIONS
12.1 Messages for transmission via the SafetyNET service are received and processed automatically at the LES. Because the system is automatic, the quality of service and information depends on accurate preparation of messages.
12.2 Messages are not reviewed for corruption or accuracy at the LES; therefore, the originator must take special care to adhere to the format specified. This dependence on syntax is one of the reasons why MSI providers must monitor the broadcasts they originate.
12.3 Participating LESs transmit SafetyNET messages over an inter-station signalling link to the Ocean Region Network Co-ordination Station (NCS) for transmission over the broadcast channel.
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 23
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12.4 Messages will be queued at the LES and scheduled for transmission according to priority and instructions contained in the special address headers (C1 – priority code and C4 – repetition code); messages with the highest priority will be transmitted first (i.e. in the order "distress", "urgency", "safety"). The originator of each message will specify in the message parameters the desired number of repetitions and the interval between transmissions.
13 – RECEIVING SAFETYNET BROADCASTS
13.1 The basic requirements of the EGC receiver are that it should continuously receive the broadcast channel (the Inmarsat-C NCS common channel) and process the messages being transmitted through the satellite. However, certain classes of receiving equipment may not provide wholly uninterrupted monitoring of the broadcast channel. For this reason, MSI providers must repeat their most important unscheduled messages 6 minutes after the first broadcast.
13.2 Although the MES receives all SafetyNET messages on the broadcast channel, it may suppress some messages from being displayed or printed automatically. For example:
.1 all messages addressed to geographical areas (circular or rectangular) other than those including the ship's current position will be automatically suppressed;
.2 for coastal warnings only (See Figure 8) it may be programmed to suppress:
a) messages containing B1 codes for coastal warning areas which have not been setup in the terminal,
b) messages containing B2 codes for subject matter of no relevance to the ship.
13.3 The MES also suppresses the printing of messages previously received. It is not possible to reject mandatory "all ship" messages such as shore-to-ship distress alerts for the area within which the ship is located. When a distress or urgency message is received, an audio and visual alarm will be given.
13.4 The following B2 code subject indicators for coastal warnings are in use:
A = Navigational warnings7 B = Meteorological warnings7 C = Ice reports D = Search and rescue information, and acts of piracy warnings7 E = Meteorological forecasts F = Pilot service messages G = AIS H = LORAN messages
I = not used J = SATNAV messages K = Other electronic navaid messages L = Other Navigational warnings – additional to B2 code A V = W = Special services allocation X = by the International SafetyNET Panel Y = Z = No messages on hand
13.5 It is recommended that, in order to ensure that all necessary MSI is available before sailing, the EGC receiver should remain in operation while the ship is in port.
7 Cannot be rejected by the receiver.
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 24
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13.6 Although reception of SafetyNET traffic is automatic, the shipboard operator must set up the receiver properly before the start of the voyage as follows:
.1 Selecting the appropriate satellite ocean region.
.2 Selecting one or more of the following (as appropriate);
a) current NAVAREA/METAREA or Sub-Area designator;
b) additional NAVAREA/METAREA designator(s);
c) relevant coastal warning area identification letter and subject indicator characters;
d) fixed position(s).
Figure 8 – EGC setup screen
Note: Figure 8 depicts the general information available on an EGC setup screen. The layout of this screen varies between different models of Inmarsat-C and mini-C MESs.
13.7 The position in MESs is up-dated automatically from integrated navigational receivers if fitted, or may be up-dated from a separate electronic position-fixing system. If there is no automatic position up-date system installed, it is recommended that the position in the MES is up-dated at least every 4 hours. If the position has not been up-dated for more than 12 hours or is unknown, all SafetyNET messages within the entire satellite ocean region will be printed or stored in the MES.
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 25
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13.8 If the MES is a Class 2 Inmarsat-C terminal (having a common receiver for Inmarsat-C messages and MSI), MSI broadcasts will only be received when the terminal is idle. Therefore a Class 2 terminal must not be in use for other communications at the times of scheduled broadcasts. Similarly, it is necessary to ensure that a Class 3 Inmarsat-C MES (having two separate receivers for Inmarsat-C messages and MSI) is tuned to the calling channel of the appropriate satellite at the times of scheduled broadcasts.
Note: More information on different classes of Inmarsat-C and Mini-C MESs is in Annex 5
14 – CHARGES FOR SAFETYNET SERVICES
14.1 IMO resolution A.707(17): Charges for Distress, Urgency and Safety Messages Through the Inmarsat System, establishes the arrangements in place for the treatment of charges.
14.2 There are no charges to the mariner for reception of SafetyNET messages.
14.3 Message transmission charges apply to MSI providers and are set at a special SafetyNET tariff by national telecommunication service providers and LESs offering EGC services.
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 26
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Annex 1
International SafetyNET Co-ordinating Panel
1 Terms of reference
To co-ordinate the development and use of the International SafetyNET Service, and in particular to:
.1 develop operating methods for the effective use of the SafetyNET service, including consideration of the need for scheduled broadcasts; .2 develop documentation in support of the SafetyNET service, in particular the International SafetyNET Manual; .3 advise Land Earth Station (LES) operators and potential registered information providers on all aspects of the Service, including system access and effective operation; .4 develop criteria and establish means for the approval and registration of potential information providers; .5 co-ordinate the registration of potential information providers; and .6 promote a proper understanding of the benefits and use of the International SafetyNET Service among the wider maritime community.
2 Contact address
The International SafetyNET Co-ordinating Panel can be contacted at the following address:
The Chairman International SafetyNET Co-ordinating Panel International Maritime Organization 4 Albert Embankment London SE1 7SR United Kingdom Telephone: +44 (0)20 7735 7611, Telefax: +44 (0)20 7587 3210 E-mail: info@imo.org
3 Panel membership
3.1 The International SafetyNET Co-ordinating Panel is open to membership by all Member Governments and also includes one member nominated by each of the following international organizations:
i) International Maritime Organization (IMO) ii) World Meteorological Organization (WMO) iii) International Hydrographic Organization (IHO) iv) International Mobile Satellite Organization (IMSO)
3.2 The following may be represented as observers on the panel:
i) IHO World-Wide Navigational Warnings Service Sub-Committee ii) IMO NAVTEX Co-ordinating Panel. iii) Expert Team on Maritime Safety Services (ETMSS) of the Joint WMO/IOCCommission for Oceanography and Marine Meteorology (JCOMM) iv) Inmarsat Global Limited
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 27
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Annex 2
Authorization, Certification and Registration of SafetyNET information providers
Two distinct and separate processes, Authorization and Certification, must be completed before an information provider will be granted Registration to access the SafetyNET broadcast service. They have been established to protect the integrity of the SafetyNET information service and clearly establish a qualification to the special SafetyNET tariff.
1 Authorization
1.1 Authorization is carried out by IMO in consultation with IHO and WMO as appropriate.
1.2 In order to obtain authorization to broadcast maritime safety information through the International SafetyNET Service, an information provider must apply to the relevant international organization for approval to participate in the internationally co-ordinated service:
Meteorological authorities – to WMO;
Hydrographic authorities – to IHO;
Search and rescue authorities – to IMO;
The International Ice Patrol – to IMO;
Others – to IMO
1.3 In considering such applications, the relevant international organizations will take into account:
.1 the established and expected availability of other information sources for the area concerned; and
.2 the need to minimize duplication of information as much as possible.
1.4 The relevant international organization will inform IMO of endorsed applications.
2 Certification
2.1 On receipt of IMO authorization, the International SafetyNET Coordinating Panel will issue a Certificate of Authorization to Participate in the International SafetyNET Service directly to the information provider with a copy to IHO or WMO or IMO, as well as to Inmarsat-C LES operators. A specimen Certificate of Authorization is shown at the end of this annex.
2.2 International SafetyNET Co-ordinating Panel will maintain the master list of all registered information providers and circulate it to IMO, IHO, WMO and all Inmarsat-C LES operators.
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 28
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3 Registration
3.1 After receiving a Certificate of Authorization, an information provider may conclude an agreement with any Inmarsat-C LES operator(s), serving the required ocean region(s), to obtain access to the system.
3.2 This will involve, in addition to the contractual aspects, registration of the information provider's identity which must be programmed into the LES control equipment.
3.3 LES operators will only register information providers who have received a Certificate of Authorization.
4 Contact addresses
International Maritime Organization The Chairman International SafetyNET Co-ordinating Panel 4 Albert Embankment London SE1 7SR United Kingdom
Telephone: +44 (0)20 7735 7611 Fax: +44 (0)20 7587 3210 E-mail: info@imo.org
International Hydrographic Organization 4 quai Antoine 1er BP445 MC98011 Monaco Cedex Principauté de MONACO
Telephone: +377 93 10 81 00 Fax +377 93 10 81 40 E-mail: info@ihb.mc
World Meteorological Organization 7bis, avenue de la Paix Case postale 2300 CH-1211 Geneva 2 Switzerland
Telephone: + 41(0) 22 730 81 11 Fax: + 41(0) 22 730 81 81 E-mail: mmo@wmo.int
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 29
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5 Sample Certificate of Authorization
4 Albert Embankment, 99 City Road, London SE1 7SR London EC1Y 1AX United Kingdom United Kingdom
[Name of authority/country]
Date: 01 Jan 2012
Certificate of Authorization to Participate as an Information Provider in the International SafetyNET Service
This is to certify that the [Name of authority/country] is authorized by the International Maritime Organization to provide Navigational Warning Services for broadcast in the International SafetyNET Service in accordance with Annex 2 of the International SafetyNET Manual.
PETER M. DOHERTY Chairman International SafetyNET Co-ordinating Panel
Certificate No. "XX"
International Maritime Organization (IMO) International Mobile Satellite Organization (IMSO)
Telephone: Telephone: National (207) 735-7611 National (207) 728-1249 International +44 (207) 735-7611 International +44 (207) 728-1249 Facsimile +44 (207) 587-3210 Facsimile +44 (207) 728-1172
IMO
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 30
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Annex 3
The Inmarsat system
1 Introduction
1.1 There are three essential components of the Inmarsat system:
.1 the Inmarsat space segment – the satellites and their ground support facilities – planned and funded by Inmarsat;
.2 the ground segment – comprises a network of Land Earth Stations (LESs), Network Coordination Stations (NCSs) and the Network Operations Centre (NOC). Each LES provides an interface between the space segment and the national and international fixed telecommunication networks; and
.3 the Mobile Earth Stations (MESs) – comprises mobile satellite communication terminals.
2 Bandwidths
2.1 Shore-to-ship communications are in the 6 GHz band (C-band) from the LES to the satellite and in the 1.5 GHz band (L-band) from satellite to ship. Ship-to-shore communications are in the 1.6 GHz band (L-band) from the ship to the satellite and in the 4 GHz band (C-band) from satellite to LES.
3 The space segment
3.1 To provide the space segment for global coverage, Inmarsat employs its own dedicated satellites.
3.2 The space segment is segmented globally into four ocean regions: Atlantic Ocean Region East (AOR-E), Atlantic Ocean Region West (AOR-W), Indian Ocean Region (IOR) and Pacific Ocean Region (POR). Each ocean region is served by a dedicated satellite. Inmarsat has full contingency plans in place in the unlikely event of any prime satellite outage. These plans are exercised regularly and are witnessed by the International Mobile Satellite Organization (IMSO). The Polar Regions – above approximate latitudes 76° N and 76° S - cannot be seen by geostationary satellites (See Figures 3 & 4).
4 The ground segment
4.1 The Inmarsat system is connected into the world-wide telecommunication networks via LESs. Many of these LESs provide Inmarsat-C EGC services.
4.2 For Inmarsat-C communication system there is a Network Coordination Station (NCS) in each ocean region, which monitors and controls communications traffic within its region. Each NCS communicates with the LESs in its ocean region, the other NCSs and the Network Operations Centre (NOC). Inmarsat-C NCSs also transmit EGC SafetyNET and FleetNET messages on the NCS common channel.
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 31
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4.3 The Inmarsat Network Operations Centre (NOC) is located in London at the Inmarsat headquarters and functions around the clock, co-ordinating the activities of the NCSs and the LESs in each ocean region.
5 Mobile Earth Stations (MESs)
5.1 Inmarsat-C and mini-C MESs with the EGC function are small, lightweight terminals, with small omni-directional antennas, for providing data and message-type services. EGC receive capability is provided by Class 2 or 3 Inmarsat-C MESs. Interfaces via RS232 ports are provided for a dedicated messaging unit, personal computer or any other data terminal equipment for message generation and display.
5.2 Class 0 standalone EGC receivers provide the capability to receive SafetyNET and FleetNET messages only; there is no transmit or receive capability for sending and receiving messages.
5.3 The technical requirements of all classes of equipment are detailed in Annex 5.
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 32
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Annex 4 Operational guidance
1 This annex contains operational guidance for the benefit of registered MSI providers who are responsible for preparing messages for broadcast via the International SafetyNET Service. Use of the codes given in this annex is mandatory for all messages in the system.
2 Types of messages and message formats are detailed in the sub-parts of this Annex. PART A – Navigational warning service PART B – Meteorological service PART C – Search and rescue (SAR) services and SAR coordination traffic PART D – Piracy countermeasures broadcast messages
Allocation of priority and service codes for EGC SafetyNET services EGC SafetyNET service Message priority Service code (type)
Navigational Warning services C1 = 1 (Safety) - normally C1 = 2 (Urgency) - exceptionally at discretion of MSI provider C2 = 04 - Navigational warning to a rectangular area C2 = 13 - Coastal warnings C2 = 24 - Navigational warnings to a circular area C2 = 31 - NAVAREA warnings
Meteorological services
C1 = 1 (Safety) - always for forecasts and warnings C1 = 2 (Urgency) - always for urgent tropical cyclone warnings only C2 = 04 - Meteorological warning to a rectangular area C2 = 13 - Met warnings or forecasts to a coastal area C2 = 24 - Met warnings to a circular area C2 = 31 - METAREA warnings or MET forecasts
SAR services: 1) shore-to-ship distress alert
C1 = 3 (Distress) - always
C2 = 14 - Shore-to-ship Distress Alert to a circular area
2) SAR co-ordination traffic
C1 = 1 (Safety) - determined by the phase of emergency C1 = 2 (Urgency) – determined by the phase of emergency C1 = 3 (Distress) - determined by the phase of emergency
C2 = 34 - SAR co-ordination to a rectangular area C2 = 44 - SAR co-ordination to a circular area
3) shore-to-ship urgency & safety traffic
C1 = 1 (Safety) C1 = 2 (Urgency)
C2 = 31 - Urgency and Safety traffic
4) general (all ships call within the Inmarsat ocean region) C1 = 2 (Urgency) C1 = 3 (Distress)
C2 = 00
Piracy countermeasures broadcast messages
C1 = 1 (Safety) C1 = 2 (Urgency) - for piracy attack warnings.
C2 = 04 - Navigational warning to a rectangular area C2 = 13 - Coastal warnings C2 = 24 - Navigational warnings to a circular area C2 = 31 - NAVAREA warnings 3 The broadcast parameters are controlled by the use of five (or six) C-codes which are combined into a generalized message address header format as follows: C0:C1:C2:C3:C4:C5
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 33
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(Spaces, colons or other delimiters between these codes will be required, depending on the communication protocol of the addressed LES)
C0 - Ocean Region.
C1 - Message Priority C2 - Service code C3 - Address code C4 - Repetition code C5 - Presentation code
Each C-code controls a different broadcast parameter and is assigned a numerical value according to the options specified in the following parts.
The additional C0 code will only be required to identify the satellite ocean region when sending a broadcast message to a LES which operates to more than one satellite ocean region, as follows:
C0 = 0 – AOR-W C0 = 1 – AOR-E C0 = 2 – POR C0 = 3 – IOR C0 = 9 – All Ocean Regions8
4 (a) All EGC messages should comprise of three elements:
Address header instruction (EGC C Codes) TEXT OF MESSAGE NNNN
Mandatory message element table Message Element Remarks Address header instruction The syntax of the special address header in relation to the exact number of digits and/or alphanumeric characters, and to the spaces between each C code is critical, and must conform to the format required by the LES or service provider as supplied in their specific instruction manual. TEXT OF MESSAGE The content of the message should be presented in UPPER Case. For Maritime Safety Information messages, the format of Navigational Warnings is defined in the Joint IMO/IHO/WMO Maritime Safety Information Manual as amended. NNNN The letters NNNN should be inserted at the end of the text to indicate "end of message".
8 Subject to availability through LES or service provider.
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 34
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(b) EGC messaged submitted for transmission (or broadcast) via a two stage access system must also include an end of transmission instruction code for the LES. This should be inserted on the final line, after NNNN. This code may vary, and must conform to the format required by the LES or service provider as supplied in their specific instruction manual.
5 The International Maritime Organization (IMO) requires that, in order to allow the use of non-dedicated receive facilities, the majority of broadcasts on the International SafetyNET Service are made at scheduled times. Broadcast schedules must be co-ordinated through the International SafetyNET Co-ordinating Panel, which can also offer advice on ways of scheduling information within the system.
6 Because errors in the header format of a message may prevent it being released, MSI providers must install an Inmarsat SafetyNET receiver and monitor broadcasts of messages which they originate.
7 For all the services described below, a cancellation or deleting facility is provided for messages transmitted to a LES with Category (b) repetition codes (See Part E). Cancellation (or deletion) procedures may vary between different LESs or service providers. Detailed operational procedure is contained in the instructions on sending EGC broadcast given to the MSI providers after registration with the LES operator or service provider.
8 The term "echo" used in all of the services described below in Parts A, B, C & D, is associated with using the respective C4 repetition codes which will initiate an automatic repeated broadcast 6 minutes after the initial scheduled or unscheduled broadcast. The 6 minute repeat or echo is used to ensure that the warning is received by the maximum number of ships.
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 35
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Part A - Navigational warning services
1 The following guidelines set out the arrangements to be used for promulgating navigational and coastal warnings via SafetyNET for the GMDSS. They are mandatory for broadcasts in the International SafetyNET Service. Broadcasts originated by the International Ice Patrol also follow the guidelines in this Part.
2 These guidelines are to be read in conjunction with the IMO/IHO World-Wide Navigational Warning Service (WWNWS) Guidance Document (IMO resolution A.706(17), as amended).
3 Navigational warnings that require an immediate broadcast should be transmitted as soon as possible after receipt. If still in force, they should be repeated in subsequent scheduled broadcasts, twice a day for six weeks or until cancelled.
4 Navigational warnings shall remain in force until cancelled by the originating Coordinator. Navigational warnings should be broadcast for as long as the information is valid; however, if they are readily available to mariners by other official means, for example in Notices to Mariners, then after a period of six weeks they may no longer be broadcast. If the navigational warning is still valid and not available by other means after 6 weeks, it should be re- issued as a new navigational warning.
5 The following C-codes shall be used for warnings issued under the auspices of the WWNWS.
5.1 C1 – Message priority
C1 = 1 (safety) C1 = 2 (urgency) (at discretion of the registered MSI provider).
5.2 C2 – Service code
C2 = 04 NAVAREA warnings for a rectangular area C2 = 13 Coastal warnings C2 = 24 Navigational warnings to a circular area C2 = 31 NAVAREA warnings
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 36
I:\CIRC\MSC\01\1364.doc
5.3 C3 – Address code
C3 = two digits X1X2
When C2 = 31, then: X1X2 are the two digits of the NAVAREA number (with a leading zero where necessary in the range 01 - 21).
C3 = four alphanumeric characters X1X2B1B2
When C2 = 13 for Coastal warnings, then: X1X2 are the two digits of the NAVAREA number (with a leading zero where necessary in the range 01 - 21). B1 is the coastal warning area A to Z B2 is the subject indicator must always be A or L, where: A = Navigational warnings L = Other Navigational warnings
C3 = twelve alphanumeric characters D1D2LaD3D4D5LoD6D7D8D9D10
When C2 = 04 for NAVAREA warnings within a rectangular area. D1D2 is latitude of south-west corner of the rectangle in degrees. La is hemisphere which will always be N for Arctic NAVAREAs XVII to XXI. D3D4D5 is longitude of south-west corner of rectangle in degrees, with leading zeros if required. Lo is longitude E or W. D6D7 is extent of rectangle in latitude (degrees). D8D9D10 is extent of rectangle in longitude (degrees). Example: a rectangle whose south-west corner is 60º N and 010º W, extending 30º north and 25º east, is coded as: 60N010W30025 Note: Latitude and longitude are limited by values from 00º to 90º latitude and 000º to 180º longitude.
5.4 C4 – Repetition code
C4 = 01 May be used for initial unscheduled broadcast of NAVAREA warnings, and coastal warnings with no echo. (transmit once on receipt) C4 = 11 Recommended for use with initial unscheduled broadcast of NAVAREA warnings, and coastal warnings. (transmit on receipt, echo 6 minutes later) C4 = 16 Use for NAVAREA or Coastal warnings scheduled for broadcast twice per day at 12 hour intervals with safety priority. Note. For NAVAREA or Coastal warnings scheduled for broadcast more than twice per day, the appropriate C4 repetition code detailed in PART E of this Manual must be used.
5.5 C5 – Presentation code C5 = 00 The code 00 for International Alphabet Number 5 is normally used
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 37
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Part B - Meteorological services
1 The following guidelines set out the arrangements to be used for promulgating meteorological forecasts and warnings via SafetyNET for the GMDSS. They are mandatory for broadcasts in the International SafetyNET Service.
2 These guidelines are to be read in conjunction with the WMO Manual on Marine Meteorological Services (WMO No. 558), as revised for the GMDSS.
3 In order to ensure uniformity of meteorological forecasts and warnings globally, the following C-codes should be used for meteorological services via SafetyNET.
3.1 C1 – Message priority
C1 = 2 (urgency) Only use for tropical cyclone warnings or urgent meteorological warnings with force 12 Beaufort or above. C1 = 1 (safety) For forecasts and other meteorological warnings.
3.2 C2 – Service code
C2 = 24 Meteorological warnings to a circular area C2 = 31 Meteorological warnings or forecasts to METAREA C2 = 13 Meteorological warnings or forecast to coastal warning area C2 = 04 METAREA warnings or forecasts for a rectangular area
3.3 C3 – Address code
C3 = ten alphanumeric characters D1D2LaD3D4D5LoR1R2R3
When C2 = 24 for Meteorological warnings to user defined circular area, then: D1D2La (three characters) is latitude of centre in degrees, and La whether north (N) or south (S). A leading zero should be used for latitudes less than 10º.
D3D4D5Lo (four characters) is longitude of centre in degrees, and Lo whether east (E) or west (W) of the prime meridian. One or two leading zeros should be used for longitudes less than 100º.
R1R2R3 (three characters) is radius of circle in nautical miles, up to 999. One or two leading zeros should be used for radius less than 100 nm. Example: A circle centred at latitude 56°N longitude 34°W with radius of 35 nautical miles is coded as: 56N034W035 C3 = two digits XX When C2 = 31, then: C3 = the two digits of the METAREA number (with a leading zero where necessary in the range 01 – 21)
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 38
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C3 = four alphanumeric characters X1X2B1B2
When C2 = 13 for Coastal warnings, then:
X1X2 are the two digits of the METAREA number (with a leading zero where necessary in the range 01 - 21). B1 is the coastal warning area A to Z B2 is the subject indicator must always be B or E, where: B = Meteorological warnings E = Meteorological forecasts
C3 = twelve alphanumeric characters D1D2LaD3D4D5LoD6D7D8D9D10
When C2 = 04 for Meteorological warnings or forecasts within a rectangular area
Note: The definition of 12 characters for a Rectangular address is given in Part A, paragraph 5.3.
3.4 C4 – Repetition code Category (a) repetition codes are used for meteorological services as follows: C4 = 01 Use for Meteorological forecast (transmit once on receipt). C4 = 11 Use for Meteorological warning (transmit on receipt followed by repeat 6 minutes later).
3.5 C5 – Presentation code C5 = 00 The code 00 for International Alphabet Number 5 is normally used.
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 39
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Part C - Search and rescue services
1 The following guidelines set out the arrangements to be used by Rescue Co-ordination Centres (RCCs) for initiating transmission of shore-to-ship distress alert relays and shore-to-ship search and rescue information. Transmissions should be in accordance with the relevant procedures of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) Radio Regulations (RR), the International Convention on Maritime Search and Rescue, 1979, as amended, and the IAMSAR Manual.
2 In order to ensure uniformity of the search and rescue broadcast product throughout the world, C-codes should be used as described in this Part.
3 Shore-to-ship distress alert relays
3.1 As a general principle, distress alert relays should be addressed to a circular area around the estimated or known position of the distressed vessel. The radius of the circle should be chosen to take account of the accuracy of the datum position, the expected density of shipping in the vicinity and the fact that the position can only be defined in the message address to the nearest whole degree of latitude and longitude. The distress alert relay message must be broadcast via all satellites which cover the area concerned. Shore-to-ship distress alert relays sent by the International SafetyNET Service should contain the identification of the unit in distress, its approximate position and other information which might facilitate rescue. C-codes should be as follows:
3.2 C1 – Message priority C1 = 3 (distress)
3.3 C2 – Service code C2 = 14 (shore-to-ship distress alert to circular areas)
Messages addressed to circular areas will only be received and printed out by EGC receivers that are located inside the circle or have not had their position kept up to date.
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 40
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3.4 C3 – Address code C3 = ten alphanumeric characters D1D2LaD3D4D5LoR1R2R3
When C2 = 14 for Distress Alert to user defined circular area, then: D1D2La (three characters) is latitude of vessel in distress in degrees (two digits) and whether north (N) or south (S): e.g., 39N (three characters total). A leading zero should be included for latitudes less than 10º.
D3D4D5Lo (four characters) is longitude of vessel in distress in degrees (three digits) and whether east (E) or west (W) of the prime meridian: e.g. 059W. A leading zero or zeros should be included for longitudes less than 100º or 10º as appropriate: e.g., use 099 for 99º and 008 for 8º.
R1R2R3 (three characters) is alert radius around distressed vessel in nautical miles. To ensure that position inaccuracies of both the distressed vessel and nearby vessels to which the message is intended do not affect receipt of messages, radius values of 200 nautical miles or larger should normally be used. Note that if a vessel's own position information is not entered into its SafetyNET receiver, every shore-to-ship distress alert relay message transmitted to the Inmarsat ocean region will be received and printed.
3.5 C 4 – Repetition code C4 = 11 Use for Distress Alerts (transmit on receipt followed by repeat 6 minutes later)
3.6 C 5 – Presentation code
C5 = 00 The code 00 for International Alphabet Number 5 is normally used.
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 41
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4 General (all ships) call
4.1 When the RCC has no indication of the position of the vessel in distress, shore-to-ship distress alert relays may be sent as general call. This will be printed in every vessel within the Inmarsat ocean region, provided the receiver is tuned to the proper ocean region satellite.
Note: This method of alert should rarely be used.
The C0:C1:C2:C3:C4:C5 codes for general calls are always as follows:
C 0 = 0 (1, 2 or 3) (if required)
C 1 = 3 (distress) or 2 (urgency) C2 = 00 C3 = 00 C4 = 11 C5 = 00
5 Search and rescue co-ordination traffic
5.1 Search and rescue co-ordination messages should be addressed to user defined circular or rectangular areas for the intent of co-ordinating the search and rescue of a vessel in distress. Priority of the message will be determined by the phase of the emergency.
5.2 C1 – Message priority
C1 = 3 (distress), 2 (urgency) or 1 (safety)
5.3 C2 – Service code
C2 = 34 Search and rescue coordination to a rectangular area. C2 = 44 Search and rescue coordination to a circular area.
5.4 C3 – Address code
C3 = twelve alphanumeric characters D1D2LaD3D4D5LoD6D7D8D9D10
When C2 = 34 Search and rescue coordination to a rectangular area. Note: The definition of 12 characters for a Rectangular address is given in Part A, paragraph 5.3
C3 = ten alphanumeric characters D1D2LaD3D4D5LoR1R2R3
When C2 = 44 Search and rescue coordination to a circular area. Note: The definition of 10 characters for a circular address is given in Part C, paragraph 3.3.
5.5 C4 – Repetition code
C4 = 11 Use for Distress Alerts (transmit on receipt followed by repeat 6 minutes later)
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 42
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5.6 C5 – Presentation code
C5 = 00 The code 00 for International Alphabet Number 5 is normally used
6 Shore-to-ship urgency and safety traffic
6.1 As a general principle, only the minimum information consistent with the safety of navigation should be broadcast. However, where such information is deemed essential, shore-to-ship information other than distress should be broadcast to a NAVAREA using C-codes as follows:
6.2 C1 – Message priority
C1 = 2 (urgency) or 1 (safety)
6.3 C2 – Service code
C2 = 31
6.4 C3 – Address code
C3 = two digits X1X2 When C2 = 31, then: X1X2 are the two digits of the NAVAREA number (with a leading zero where necessary in the range 01 - 21).
6.5 C4 – Repetition code
C4 = 11 Use for unscheduled broadcasts of urgency and safety traffic (transmit on receipt followed by repeat 6 minutes later)
6.6 C5 – Presentation code
C5 = 00 The code 00 for International Alphabet Number 5 is normally used
7 SAR broadcast for overlapping satellite ocean regions
7.1 Search and rescue distress and urgency broadcasts should be promulgated through all Inmarsat satellites serving the area surrounding the vessel in distress. This is to ensure that vessels with receivers tuned to any ocean region satellite serving the area will receive the message.
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 43
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Part D - Piracy countermeasures broadcast messages
1 On receiving a message of alert or any other information concerning a threat of attack (from the Security Forces Authority responsible for the operational application of the urgency plans (countermeasures) in the region or another MRCC, for example), the MRCC should ask the NAVAREA co-ordinator (or any other competent authority in accordance with local arrangements), to send out a warning through the appropriate MSI network (NAVTEX or SafetyNET) and other broadcasting networks for warnings to shipping, if these exist.
2 There are two kinds of MSI broadcast messages associated with piracy countermeasures: the daily situation report (SITREP) and a piracy attack warning. Specific guidance on drafting and broadcasting these messages is given below.
3 The daily situation report should be broadcast via SafetyNET at a regular time around 0800 local time daily. The following paragraphs provide specific guidance on broadcast procedures.
4 The daily situation report should be broadcast to a rectangular area enclosing the region of probable piracy attacks (based on historical data) plus a margin of 700 nautical miles (24 hours' steaming by a fast ship) in every direction.
5 The following C codes illustrate those to be used for SafetyNET broadcasts of the daily SITREP:
5.1 C1 – Message priority
C1 = 1 (safety)
5.2 C2 – Service code
C2 = 04 SITREP to a rectangular area. C2 = 24 SITREP to a circular area.
5.3 C3 – Address code
C3 = twelve alphanumeric characters D1D2LaD3D4D5LoD6D7D8D9D10
When C2 = 04 SITREP to a rectangular area. Note: The definition of 12 characters for a Rectangular address is given in Part A, paragraph 5.3
C3 = ten alphanumeric characters D1D2LaD3D4D5LoR1R2R3
When C2 = 24 SITREP to a circular area. Note: The definition of 10 characters for a circular address is given in Part C, paragraph 3.3.
5.4 C4 – Repetition code
C4 = 18 Broadcast every 24 hours (no echo) until cancelled
5.5 C5 – Presentation code
C5 = 00 The code 00 for International Alphabet Number 5 is normally used
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 44
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6 A piracy attack warning shall be broadcast as an "URGENT" NAVAREA or Coastal Warning immediately on receipt of the source information and at least at the next scheduled broadcast or for as long as the information remains valid. In the area of overlap coverage from two or three ocean region satellites, urgent warnings will be broadcast over all satellites which cover the affected region. Subject indicator character B2 = L should be used in Coastal Warning areas. The specific area in which the attack has taken place is to be quoted in the first line of the text, using no more detail than is necessary to indicate the probable location of further attacks, e.g., WESTERN PHILIP CHANNEL or VICINITY HORSBURGH LIGHT. The description of the pirate vessel and its last observed movements are to be kept as brief as possible and should give only those details which are of significance in avoiding other attacks.
7 The following C codes illustrate those to be used for SafetyNET broadcast of Piracy attack warnings:
7.1 C1 – Message priority
C1 = 2 (urgency)
7.2 C2 – Service code
C2 = 13 Coastal Warnings C2 = 31 NAVAREA Warnings
7.3 C3 – Address code C3 = two digits X1X2 When C2 = 31 then: X1X2 are the two digits of the NAVAREA number (with a leading zero where necessary in the range 01 to 21). C3 = four alphanumeric characters X1X2B1B2 When C2 = 13 for Coastal warnings then: X1X2 are the two digits of the NAVAREA number (with a leading zero where necessary in the range 01 to 21). B1 is the coastal warning area A to Z. B2 is the subject indicator and must always be A or L, where A = Navigational warnings L = Other navigational warnings
7.4 C4 – Repetition code
C4 = 16 Broadcast every 12 hours with no echo until cancelled.
7.5 C5 – Presentation code
C5 = 00 The code 00 for International Alphabet Number 5 is normally used
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 45
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8 Date/time should always be quoted in the form DDHHMM UTC MoMoMo YY, e.g.,
251256 UTC JUN 12.
Note: UTC (Universal Co-ordinated Time) is the same time-zone as GMT (Z).
9 Geographical positions should be quoted in the standard format: D 1D2M1M2La D3D4D5M3M4Lo where:
D1D2 = degrees latitude (with leading zero if required) M1M2 = minutes latitude La = hemisphere (N or S) D3D4D5 = degrees longitude (with leading zeros if required) M3M4 = minutes longitude Lo = longitude (E or W)
as in the example: 5419N10327E
Notes:
1. Examples of format and drafting guidance for Piracy Warnings is contained in the Joint IMO/IHO/WMO Manual on Maritime Safety Information (IMO MSC.1/Circ.1310 and IHO Special Publication No. S53.)
2. Decimals of minutes will seldom be necessary or appropriate for reports of this kind.
3. Where the name of a geographical feature is used instead of a geographical position, a name should be chosen that appears on all commonly used charts of the area. Local knowledge should not be required for understanding the message.
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 46
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Part E - Repetition codes (C4)
1 The C4 repetition codes are divided into two categories:
Category (a) for messages that are required to be repeated a finite number of times; and Category (b) for messages that are required to be repeated at specified intervals until cancelled by the MSI provider.
1.1 Category (a) repetition codes:
Code Instruction 01 transmit once on receipt 11 transmit on receipt followed by repeat 6 minutes later 61 transmit on receipt and 1 hour after initial broadcast (twice) 62 transmit on receipt and 2 hours after initial broadcast (twice) 63 transmit on receipt and 3 hours after initial broadcast (twice) 64 transmit on receipt and 4 hours after initial broadcast (twice) 66 transmit on receipt and 12 hours after initial broadcast (twice) 67 transmit on receipt and 24 hours after initial broadcast (twice) 70 transmit on receipt, 12 hours after initial broadcast and then12 hours after the second broadcast (three times) 71 transmit on receipt, 24 hours after initial broadcast and then 24 hours after the second broadcast (three times)
1.2 Category (b) repetition codes:
A Category (b) repetition code allows a message to be repeated indefinitely or until cancelled by the message provider. The repetition period can be set at between 1 and 120 hours. In addition, each transmission can be echoed after a fixed period of 6 minutes. Repetition codes are made up by stating the multiplier first, followed by the delay period: Multiplier x Delay where the multiplier specifies the amount of delay periods between each broadcast, and the delay is a fixed number of hours. The multiplier digit may be any digit from 1 to 5 as follows:
1 = 1 specified delay period between broadcasts 2 = 2 specified delay periods between broadcasts 3 = 3 specified delay periods between broadcasts 4 = 4 specified delay periods between broadcasts 5 = 5 specified delay periods between broadcasts
The delay digit coding is as follows:
2 = 1 hour delay; no echo 3 = 1 hour delay; with echo 4 = 6 hour delay; no echo 5 = 6 hour delay; with echo 6 = 12 hour delay; no echo 7 = 12 hour delay; with echo 8 = 24 hour delay; no echo 9 = 24 hour delay; with echo
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 47
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The various combinations (Multiplier x Delay) available, are shown in the table below:
Code Instruction 12 repeat broadcast every 1 hour with no echo. 13 repeat broadcast every 1 hour with an echo 6 minutes after each broadcast. 22 repeat broadcast every 2 hours with no echo. 23 repeat broadcast every 2 hours with an echo 6 minutes after each broadcast. 32 repeat broadcast every 3 hours with no echo. 33 repeat broadcast every 3 hours with an echo 6 minutes after each broadcast. 42 repeat broadcast every 4 hours with no echo. 43 repeat broadcast every 4 hours with an echo 6 minutes after each broadcast. 52 repeat broadcast every 5 hours with no echo. 53 repeat broadcast every 5 hours with an echo 6 minutes after each broadcast. 14 repeat broadcast every 6 hours with no echo. 15 repeat broadcast every 6 hours with an echo 6 minutes after each broadcast. 16 (or 24) repeat broadcast every 12 hours with no echo. 17 (or 25) repeat broadcast every 12 hours with an echo 6 minutes after each broadcast. 34 repeat broadcast every 18 hours with no echo. 35 repeat broadcast every 18 hours with an echo 6 minutes after each broadcast. 18 (or 26; or 44) repeat broadcast every 24 hours with no echo. 19 (or 27; or 45) repeat broadcast every 24 hours with an echo 6 minutes after each broadcast. 54 repeat broadcast every 30 hours with no echo. 55 repeat broadcast every 30 hours with an echo 6 minutes after each broadcast. 36 repeat broadcast every 36 hours with no echo. 37 repeat broadcast every 36 hours with an echo 6 minutes after each broadcast. 28 (or 46) repeat broadcast every 48 hours with no echo. 29 (or 47) repeat broadcast every 48 hours with an echo 6 minutes after each broadcast. 56 repeat broadcast every 60 hours with no echo. 57 repeat broadcast every 60 hours with an echo 6 minutes after each broadcast. 38 repeat broadcast every 72 hours with no echo. 39 repeat broadcast every 72 hours with an echo 6 minutes after each broadcast. 48 repeat broadcast every 96 hours with no echo. 49 repeat broadcast every 96 hours with an echo 6 minutes after each broadcast. 58 repeat broadcast every 120 hours with no echo. 59 repeat broadcast every 120 hours with an echo 6 minutes after each broadcast.
Note – Not all codes may be provided by all service providers.
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 48
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Annex 5
EGC receiver specifications
Technical requirements for Enhanced Group Call receivers for SOLAS-compliant MESs
1 EGC SafetyNET receivers for SOLAS installations
1.1 Background
The global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS) is a radiocommunication system based on satellite and terrestrial technology, designed to improve communications relating to distress and safety of life at sea. It was adopted by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) in 1988, in the form of Amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS), 1974 and came into effect on 1 February 1992. Implementation was completed on 1 February 1999.
It is the responsibility of national Administrations to determine whether a radio installation on board a ship meets the SOLAS requirements. This is done by national Type Acceptance or Approval testing of the sub-systems included in the installation and by inspection of the complete installation by a radio surveyor.
National Type Acceptance testing for SOLAS equipment is usually based on GMDSS specifications and procedures prepared by IMO and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) on their behalf, although other national or regional specifications may be invoked as well.
These technical requirements were defined by Inmarsat for equipment manufacturers and have been extracted from the System Definition Manual (SDM) for the Inmarsat-C communications system.
Enhanced Group Call (EGC) receive facilities are used by SOLAS Convention ships as well as ships not required to comply with the requirements of the SOLAS Convention, as amended. It should be noted that EGC receive facilities intended to meet SOLAS Convention requirements must comply with the IMO Recommendation on Performance Standards for Enhanced Group Call Equipment contained in IMO resolution [A.664(16), as amended].
The specific guidance given in this annex has been carefully coordinated to ensure that the automatic functions of the SafetyNET receiver work properly. Land Earth Stations providing Inmarsat-C services for the GMDSS must comply with all relevant aspects of the Inmarsat-C SDM, including provision of the EGC SafetyNET services.
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 49
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IMO and IEC documents, which are identified in section 1.2, do not only summarize the general requirements for GMDSS equipment, but also the special requirements for EGC SafetyNET receivers for use in SOLAS installations, as specified by IMO/IEC.
A number of the Inmarsat specifications have been completely revised to reflect the latest IMO/IEC requirements, for example, electromagnetic compatibility and environmental requirements.
1.2 Principal relevant documents
For Inmarsat-C and mini-C GMDSS compliant MESs with EGC SafetyNET function, the principal relevant documents in addition to the Inmarsat-C SDM are:
.1 Performance Standards for Enhanced Group Call Equipment – Annex: Recommendation on Performance Standards for Enhanced Group Call Equipment, published by IMO as resolution [A.664(16), as amended].
.2 General Requirements for Shipborne Radio Equipment Forming Part of the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) and for Electronic Navigational Aids, published by IMO as resolution A.694(17).
.3 Performance Standards for Inmarsat Standard-C Ship Earth Stations Capable of Transmitting and Receiving Direct-printing Communications – Annex: Recommendation on Performance Standards for Inmarsat Standard-C Ship Earth Stations Capable of Transmitting and Receiving Direct-printing Communications, published by IMO as resolution A.807(19), as amended by resolution MSC.68(68), annex 4.
.4 Shipborne Radio Equipment Forming Part of the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System and Marine Navigational Equipment, published by the IEC as IEC 60945.
.5 Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) – Part 4: Inmarsat-C Ship Earth Station and Inmarsat Enhanced Group Call (EGC) Equipment – Operational and Performance Requirements, Methods of Testing and Required Test Results, published by the IEC as IEC 61097-4.
.6 Maritime Design and Installation Guidelines (DIGs), Annex B, issue 6 of April 2008 published by Inmarsat at: http://www.inmarsat.com/Maritimesafety/DIGs.pdf
2 Introduction
2.1 Enhanced Group Calls
Enhanced Group Calls are a message broadcast service transmitted over the Inmarsat-C communications system. The service allows terrestrial information providers to pass messages or data to Class 2 or Class 3 MESs with EGC receivers or Class 0 stand-alone EGC receivers through the Inmarsat-C LESs. The messages are processed at the addressed LES and forwarded to the NCS which transmits them on the common channel.
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 50
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2.2 EGC receiver
An EGC receiver is defined as a single-channel receiver with a dedicated message processor. Mobile Earth Stations of Class 2 and 3 provide an EGC capability in addition to To-Ship and From-Ship messaging capabilities; class 0 MESs are self-contained EGC receivers as shown in Figure 9.
Note: Most of the existing models of Inmarsat-C and mini-C Maritime terminals on the market are Class 2 MESs.
Transmiter Receiver
Message processor
Inm-C
Transmiter Receiver
Message processor
Inm-C
EGC message processor
Inm-C
EGC message processor
EGC receiver
Class 0 (stand-alone EGC receiver)
Class 1 (No EGC receiver)
Class 2
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 51
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Transmiter Receiver
Message processor
Inm-C
EGC message processor
EGC receiver
Figure 9 – Classes of Inmarsat-C Mobile Earth Stations
2.3 Type approval
The Inmarsat-C SDM presents the technical requirements and recommendations for an EGC receiver. These requirements must be satisfied before the equipment can be utilized in the Inmarsat system. Procedures for type approval by Inmarsat of a manufacturer's design are provided in a complementary document entitled Type Approval Procedures for Inmarsat-C and mini-C Ship Earth Stations published by Inmarsat.
3 General requirements
3.1 Mandatory capabilities
The mandatory capabilities of SafetyNET receivers for SOLAS applications are:
.1 Continuous reception of an NCS common channel and processing of the information according to the EGC message protocol; a Class 2 Inmarsat-C MES continuously receives the NCS common channel when not engaged in general communications;
.2 Automatic recognition of messages directed to fixed and absolute geographical areas and service codes as selected by the receiver operator or based upon input(s) from navigational equipment;
.3 SafetyNET receivers meet the requirements of IEC 61097-4 and IEC 60945; and
.4 Where automatic updates are not available, provision is made for a visual indication if the ship's position has not been updated during the last 12 hours. It is only possible to reset this indication by revalidating the ship's position.
Class 3
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 52
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4 NCS common channel selection
4.1 General
EGC receivers are equipped with facilities for storing up to 20 NCS channel numbers. Four of these are permanently assigned global beam channel numbers and frequencies as follows:
NCS
NSC common channel Channel No. Frequency AOR-West 11080 1537.70 MHz AOR-East 12580 1541.45 MHz POR 12580 1541.45 MHz IOR 10840 1537.10 MHz
These four channel numbers are stored in ROM and are not alterable.
4.2 NCS scanning
Automatic NCS scanning on a regular basis is prohibited in SOLAS SafetyNET receivers. In the event of low signal strength from the satellite, an alarm is raised and the operator is advised to initiate NCS scanning manually.
5 Message-processing requirements
5.1 General
Acceptance or rejection of the EGC service code types is under operator control except that receivers always receive navigational warnings; meteorological warnings, SAR information and To-Ships distress alerts which are directed to a fixed or absolute geographical area within which the receiver is situated.
5.2 Display devices
5.2.1 Message display
The display is capable of presenting at least 40 characters per line of text. The EGC receiver ensures that if a word cannot be accommodated in full on one line it is transferred to the next line.
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 53
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5.2.2 Status display
An indication of EGC carrier frame synchronization (or loss of synchronization) is provided.
5.3 Printer requirements
A printer is required for a SOLAS SafetyNET receiver. Received EGC messages may be stored for later printing with an indication to the operator that the message has been received. However, distress or urgency priority calls are directly printed as well as stored. Means are also provided not to print or store the same EGC message after it has been received error-free and printed.
Messages are not printed until completely received.
A local audible alarm is sounded to give advanced warning of a printer "paper-low" condition.
All SafetyNET messages are annotated with the date and time (UTC) of reception. This information is displayed or printed with the message.
5.4 Character codes
For the EGC service, the International Reference Version of the International Alphabet 5 (IA5), also known as ASCII (a standard alphanumerical character set based on 7-bit codes) is used.
5.5 Operator control
The following control functions and displays are provided as a minimum:
.1 selection of EGC carrier frequency;
For SOLAS SafetyNET receivers:
.2 means of inputting the following information:
.1 MES's position co-ordinates;
.2 current and planned (additional) NAVAREA(s)/METAREA(s);
.3 current and planned coastal warning area (B1 Code); and
.4 coastal warning subject indicator character (B2 Code).
Receivers are fitted with operator controls to allow the operator to select desired geographical areas and message categories. Details of the geographical areas and message categories which have been selected for reception by the operator are readily available.
5.6 EGC receiver memory capacity requirements
Both temporary and non-volatile memory is required in an EGC receiver for the following purposes:
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 54
I:\CIRC\MSC\01\1364.doc
.1 message buffering;
.2 maintaining message identification records;
.3 storing position co-ordinates and NAVAREA(s)/METAREA(s) data; and
.4 storing expansion of NCS common channel numbers.
5.7 EGC receiver addressing
The five basic methods of addressing EGC receivers are:
.1 all-mobiles call;
.2 Inmarsat system message addressing;
.3 group addressing;
.4 unique addressing; and
.5 geographical area addressing including coastal addressing.
The type of address used in the header of an EGC packet is uniquely determined by the "C2" service code field.
5.8 Message identification
All messages are transmitted with a unique sequence number, originating LES ID and service code. Each subsequent transmission of the message contains the original sequence number. This facility allows multiple printing of repeated messages to be inhibited.
5.9 Geographical area addressing
Geographical area addressing refers to messages transmitted to MESs in a particular area. The area may be expressed in terms of a fixed, pre-defined area such as the NAVAREA/METAREA, or satellite coastal warning area, or in terms of an absolute geographical address expressed as latitude and longitude coordinates on the surface of the earth. An absolute geographical area address is a representation of a closed boundary on the surface of the earth given in the address field of the message header. The receiver recognizes two forms of absolute geographical addressing: rectangular and circular. Each form is specified in terms of an absolute position in latitude and longitude and further parameters that completely specify the boundary.
In order to process a geographical area address, the receiver shall be programmed with the MES's current position. The position may be entered automatically from an integrated or external navigation aid or entered manually. The receiver provides notification to the operator when the position has not been updated for four hours. If the MES's position has not been updated for more than 12 hours, or is unknown, all SafetyNET messages will be printed or stored in memory.
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 55
I:\CIRC\MSC\01\1364.doc
A geographical area address is considered valid for a particular MES if its current position falls inside or on the boundary specified by the address. It is a mandatory requirement that the operator be able to select more than one area, so that messages directed to other area(s) of interest can be provided. It is recommended that the operator be able to select at least four areas.
6 Link performance monitoring
The SafetyNET EGC receiver continuously monitors the received bulletin board error rate (BBER) as a measure of link performance whenever it is tuned and synchronized to a NCS (or LES) TDM. The receiver stores a count of the number of bulletin boards received in error out of the last 100 received. This count is continuously updated frame by frame.
7 Alarms and indications
The following alarms and indications are provided at a SOLAS SafetyNET receiver and meet the operational requirements for alarms stated in IEC 61097-4.
7.1 Distress/Urgency priority call alarm
For SOLAS SafetyNET receivers:
Provision is made for a specific audible alarm and visual indication at the position from which the ship is normally navigated to indicate receipt of SafetyNET messages with distress or urgency priority. It is not possible to disable this alarm and it is only possible to re-set it manually, and then only from the position where the message is displayed or printed.
7.2 Other alarms and indications
.1 High BBER;
.2 Printer paper low;
.3 Receiver fault indication;
.4 Loss of receiver synchronization; and
.5 Position update.
Additional alarms and indications may be provided at the manufacturer's discretion.
8 Electromagnetic compatibility
The interference and electromagnetic compatibility requirements of IEC 60945-applies.
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 56
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9 Environmental conditions
SOLAS SafetyNET receivers shall operate satisfactorily under the environmental conditions specified in the SDM. The latest issues of IEC 61097-4 and IEC 60945 apply.
10 Navigational interface
In order that a receiver's position may be automatically updated, receivers may be equipped with an interface to navigational instruments. A suggested standard interface is in IEC 61162, Part 1 (NMEA 0183) Standard for Interfacing Electronic Marine Navigational Devices.
Note: The majority of modern maritime MESs have an integrated navigational receiver.
MSC.1/Circ.1364 Annex, page 57
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Annex 6
Procedure for amending the International SafetyNET Manual
1 Proposals for amendment or enhancement of the International SafetyNET Manual should be submitted to the IMO Maritime Safety Committee through the Sub-Committee on Radiocommunications and Search and Rescue.
2 Amendments to this Manual should normally come into force at intervals of approximately two years or at such longer periods as determined by the Maritime Safety Committee at the time of adoption. Amendments adopted by Maritime Safety Committee will be notified to all concerned, will provide at least 12 months' notification and will come into force on 1 January of the following year.
3 The agreement of the International Hydrographic Organization, International Mobile Satellite Organization, the World Meteorological Organization and the active participation of other bodies should be sought, according to the nature of the proposed amendments.
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