INTRODUCTION TO THE PROGRAMME This programme is intended for seafarers whose mother tongue is not English, but who need to communicate in that language.

The Seafarer's Language Course

English time

The Seafarer's Language Course

INTRODUCTION TO THE PROGRAMME

This programme is intended for seafarers whose mother tongue is not English, but who need to communicate in that language. English is becoming the most extensively used language of the sea, being that generally used in intership communications and navigational/meteorological warnings. There is a definite need for an international language at sea, and it is the already widespread use of English which makes it the most practical choice.

This programme has been written by seafarers for seafarers. Common aspects of a seafarers life are described, in which frequent use of marine terminology and jargon is included. It is intended that the dialogues in conjunction with the audio cassettes should provide a realistic and practical framework for a seafarer's learning of English.

The course has been designed in such a way as to describe, scene by scene, various situations that occur during the voyage of an oil tanker from Punta Cardon Venezuela to Piney Point, U.S.A.

Each scene contains dialogues and descriptive passages followed by extracts from the Standard Marine Navigational Vocabulary related to that particular scene. In some cases, documents, check lists and forms have also been included. In order for the material to he fully exploited various language exercises are given. These, together with the dialogues can also be found on the cassettes. The pack contains check lists of Bridge Procedures which can be a useful guide, and should be used as a key to projects set at the end of various scenes.

SHIPS OF THE SEA

There are many types of sea-going vessels other than oil tankers and tankers themselves can be divided into various categories: gas tankers--liquified petroleum gas, LPG or natural gas, LNG; obos—oil--bulk oil, which some-times carry oil and sometimes carry bulk such as grain, feeding stuffs or ore. Ships that ply the sea also include general cargo ships either of the break bulk or dry bulk type; roll-on roll-off (known as ro/ros, container ships; reefer ships and barge carriers. There are passenger ships ranging from large ocean going liners to small cabin cruisers, private yachts, and of course, the vast range of military warships of different types and tonnage.

RSS
No comments yet. Be the first to add a comment!
Loading...

Subscriptions

All logbook
LOGBOOK from Any More
LOGBOOK/Maritime industry
LOGBOOK/Maritime industry from Any More