Soil Feeder: Fermenting my Everyday

Soil Feeder: Fermenting my Everyday
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Not long ago our human species lived in a world of endless resources and little accountability for nonhuman organisms. This was a time when the art of cooking provided nourishment for humans only. We are fortunate to live in fast changing times that demand that we drastically expand our culinary horizon. Population growth means that a growing share of the total biomass is incarnated in human and animal bodies. As the dominating species of this planet we need to be much more conscious about the human role in the material and energy flows of our biosphere. That’s where Soil Feeder comes into play.The living human organism produces metabolic residues that have a particular meaning and purpose in the universal digestive system. For good reason why human and humus are etymologically closely related words. The annual amount of nutrients released in the urine and faeces of one person could provide fertiliser to grow 250 kg of wheat [1]. Urbanisation and a blind sense of hygiene have disconnected our physiological link with the earth. By disposing our metabolic residues in flush toilets we break the food loop and contaminate the water cycle. In our sewage systems and landfills our body nutrients and biowastes are rotting away and releasing huge amounts of methane and ammonia – greenhouse gases 17 times more climate-damaging than regular carbon dioxide. We are turning a life force into a biohazard.In response the Soil Feeder reinstates the human-nature cycle as a life-affirming, open learning experience. Adopting the Terra Preta method [3] – a recently rediscovered, ancient resource management method from indigenous Amazonian civilisations – everybody can sensitively convert their metabolic residues into healthy fertiliser and help activate local soils into ‘carbon-sequestering sinks’.CREDITSScientific Advisors: David Freudenberger, Hermann Paulenz, Institute of Wastewater Management and Water Protection, The Hamburg University of Technology. Supporters: Madoka Yoshitomi, Karina Bontes Forward, Gaby Ho, Jonny Crane, Paul D’Arcy, Adam Broinowski, Assa Doron, Olivier Krischer, The Working Bees and The Dirty Beanstalk, Sustainable Living Community ANU Organic Garden, The Australian National University, Peter & Jenny, Randall Organic Rice. Dedicated to: The Kurikuru people in Amazonia,stewards of the ancient Terra Preta method.REFERENCES:[1] Reckin, Jürgen (2010). New Insights in matters of Plant Nutrition, Soil Microbes and their role in Recycling of Human Excretas and regenerating Soil Fertility[2] Ariane Krause, Ariana; Jacobsen, Sirkka (2011). Aspekte der Hygienisierung im Kontext der Entwicklung eines neuen Sanitär-Ansatzes[3] Terra Preta Sanitation (TPS) is a clean, ecological method to convert kitchen scraps, excrements and urine through fermentation, high-temperature charcoal addition and vermi-composting into safe and fertile soil. The collection of organic matter from kitchen and toilet in a closed (anaerobic), fermentation-powered bucket-toilet allows everybody – with access to a composting site – to recycle valuable plant nutrients in an emission-free, water-preserving way that integrates easily with existing infrastructures and lifestyles.